King county elections 2015 results

King county elections 2015 results DEFAULT

54 conjuntos de datos encontrados

  • County

    2012 Special February - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    February 2012 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2010 Special February - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    February 2010 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2016 Primary - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    August 2016 primary election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2008 Primary - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    August 2008 primary election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2010 General - Election results - State Senator LD 41 recount

    King County, Washington —

    November 2010 general election - recount dataset for the State Senator Legislative District 41

  • County

    2013 Special February - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    February 2013 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2011 General - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    November 2011 general election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    August 2007 Primary Election Final Precinct Results

    King County, Washington —

    Final precinct level results for the August 2007 Primary Election.

  • County

    2009 Special March - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    March 2009 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2013 Special June - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    June 2013 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2013 General - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    November 2013 general election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2015 Special February - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    February 2015 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2014 Special February - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    February 2014 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2008 Primary - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    August 2008 primary election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2014 Primary Election Results by precinct (eCanvass dataset does not contain PCO data)

    King County, Washington —

    August 2014 primary election; final/official results by precinct Does not contain PCO races.

  • County

    2016 Special February - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    February 2016 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2015 General - Election Night Results Abstract by Precinct

    King County, Washington —

    November 2015 election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2013 Special April - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    April 2013 special election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2004 General - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    November 2004 general election; final/official results by precinct.

  • County

    2016 General - Election Results by precinct (complete eCanvass dataset)

    King County, Washington —

    November 2016 general election; final/official results by precinct.

54 conjuntos de datos encontrados

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Election Results

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by Ashley Archibald, Elizabeth Turnbull, and Phil Manzano

Editors’ Note: We will continue to update this article with election updates in the coming days.


Voters narrowed their choices for Seattle Mayor, Seattle City Council, and King County Executive in the Tuesday, Aug. 3, primary where an estimated 40% of registered King County voters were expected to cast their ballot. 

In addition to a myriad of city candidates and special district elections, Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes is in a tight race to hold onto the position. Also, King County voters approved Proposition No. 1 “Best Start for Kids” ordinance, according to early unofficial results. Here’s a rundown of the most prominent races in the South Seattle area.

Seattle Mayor’s Race

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

Bruce Harrell and Lorena González are set to face off in November’s general election. Both candidates led Seattle’s mayoral race during the primary election, Bruce Harrell with 34% and Lorena González with 32%.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Bruce Harrell and Lorena González are continuing to lead Seattle’s mayoral race with 34% and 32% of the vote respectively.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Bruce Harrell and Lorena González are continuing to lead Seattle’s mayoral race with 34% and 32% of the vote respectively.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Bruce Harrell and Lorena González are continuing to lead Seattle’s mayoral race with 37% and 30% of the vote respectively.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Bruce Harrell and Lorena González are continuing to lead Seattle’s mayoral race with 38% and 28% of the vote respectively.


Bruce Harrell and Lorena González pulled ahead in Seattle’s crowded mayoral race Tuesday night with 38% and 28% of the vote respectively, setting up a potential showdown between the two former colleagues.

King County Elections dropped the first batch of ballots just after 8 p.m. on Tuesday night, comprising 18.12% of Seattle’s registered voters.

González and supporters watched the results come in from Jellyfish Brewing in Georgetown. 

“Seattle voters are sending a powerful message and that is a message of change,” González shouted to a jubilant crowd. 

Council President Lorena Gonzalez raises a fist during her speech

In a statement Tuesday night, Harrell said that he was “energized” by the early results.

“Our campaign’s message of unity, accountability, and action clearly resonated with voters,” Harrell said. “I’m looking forward to taking this energy into the general election and into office as Mayor as we unite our city and address the challenges facing Seattle.”

Recent polling showed Harrell, a former City Council president, in the lead heading into the night with González, the current City Council president, trailing behind. Former Chief Seattle Club Executive Director Colleen Echohawk took third with just over 8% of the vote, followed by former State Rep. Jessyn Farrell. Challenger Andrew Grant Houston ran a competitive campaign, securing $346,325 in Democracy Vouchers and 2.6% of votes on Aug. 3.

The Seattle Ethics and Elections Committee recorded 15 people in the race as of Aug. 3.

Harrell is a three-term councilmember and briefly interim mayor after former Mayor Ed Murray resigned amid allegations of child sex abuse. González won her first race in 2015, becoming the first Latina councilmember in Seattle’s history. 

Echohawk’s campaign took on both of them, airing ads that targeted the ongoing issue of homelessness and touting her own record for creating affordable housing and moving people indoors. Houston ran to the left of the lot, focusing his platform on land use reform, strengthening public transit, and defunding the police department, among other things.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan announced she would not run for reelection in December 2020, throwing the doors open for potential candidates. More than 15 entered the field, most of whom ran on issues surrounding homelessness, a key issue for Seattle voters according to a poll by the Northwest Progressive Institute.

Nearly 70% of respondents said that the next mayor should respond to homelessness in the poll. What that means is up in the air — the City Council voted to move most of its homelessness outreach and response to the new Regional Homelessness Authority (KCHRA) in 2019. The transition is still in the works, with outstanding questions about how workers in the existing Homelessness Strategy and Investment Division may or may not move to the new authority. Voters will also have an opportunity in November to weigh in on an amendment to the City Charter that would dictate certain policy aspects around homelessness.

The leading candidates qualified for Democracy Vouchers, a program that allows Seattle residents to direct up to $100 to candidates who collected 600 signatures and 600 qualified donations of at least $10. “Qualified” donations and signatures must come from U.S. citizens, nationals, or lawful permanent residents. They must be 18 years old or older.

Houston garnered the most Democracy Voucher donations at $346,325. Echohawk received $312,625 through the program, with González following at $276,475. Harrell trailed the group with $157,725 in vouchers for his campaign.

The new mayor will have a full dance card. The coronavirus pandemic highlighted long-standing social issues including homelessness and the historic lack of investment in BIPOC communities. Gun violence in King County has soared, with multiple deadly shootings in Seattle just a week before the election. Efforts to cut back the SPD budget in early 2021 drew criticism from a federal judge in charge of overseeing the federal consent decree that was placed on the city in 2012. They’ll also need to hire a new police chief.

Seattle City Attorney’s Race

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

Nicole Thomas-Kennedy finished the primary election with 36% of the vote, and Ann Davison finished with 32.7%. The two will be running against each other in November’s general election. Incumbent Pete Holmes conceded the race on Aug. 6, finishing behind Ann Davison with 30.6% of the vote.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Nicole Thomas-Kennedy continues to lead, with 36% of the vote. Ann Davison, with 32.7% of the vote, remains ahead of incumbent Pete Holmes, with 30.6% of the vote.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is now leading, with 36% of the vote. Ann Davison, with 32.7% of the vote, remains ahead of incumbent Pete Holmes, with 30.7% of the vote.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Ann Davison is still leading, with 34.5% of the vote. Nicole Thomas-Kennedy, with 33.19% of the vote, has now surpassed incumbent Pete Holmes, with 32.02% of the vote.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Ann Davison is still leading, with 34.9% of the vote, over incumbent Pete Holmes, who has 32.66% of the vote. Nicole Thomas-Kennedy is not far behind with 32.1% of the vote, a difference of 551 votes.


Ann Davison took a slim lead over incumbent Pete Holmes in the race that will define the prosecutorial arm of the Seattle government.  

Davison had about 35% of the vote to Holmes’ 32.80% which was a near tie with candidate Nicole Thomas-Kennedy’s 32.15%, a difference of 556 votes.

The Holmes campaign will “watch the returns over the week ahead,” wrote campaign manager Matt Wieck in an email Tuesday night.

The race for Seattle’s City Attorney had no clear leader going into the contest with 12-year Holmes polling slightly above challengers Thomas-Kennedy and Davison.

The candidates presented a stark choice. Holmes ran to the left of the former incumbent Tom Carr in 2009, winning by a 26-point margin. He ran unopposed in 2013 and defeated challenger Scott Lindsay for the job in 2017. He’s known for his advocacy around marijuana legalization and vacating sentences around the drug but has come under fire by critics who see him as either too hard or too soft on misdemeanor crime.

Thomas-Kennedy is a former public defender and self-proclaimed abolitionist who believes Holmes is using his office to prosecute people for crimes of poverty. Her campaign focused on ceasing prosecution for most misdemeanors, fighting wage theft, stopping sweeps of homeless encampments, and decriminalizing sex work, among other positions.

Davison is the furthest to the right of the three. She ran an unsuccessful campaign for City Council in 2019 and lieutenant governor in 2020. She’s the lone Republican in the nonpartisan race. Davison focused her campaign on cracking down on low-level crimes that she says have undermined Seattleites’ sense of safety over the 12 years of Holmes’ tenure. The Seattle Times endorsed Davison in her 2019 and 2021 races.

Thomas-Kennedy and Holmes both participated in the Democracy Voucher program, which allows Seattleites to direct up to $100 to individual campaigns. As of Aug. 3, Holmes reported $101,196 in fundraising with $57,475 from vouchers, while Thomas-Kennedy raised $115,747.04 with $160,425 from vouchers. Davison did not participate in the Democracy Voucher program.

When the dust settles, two candidates will advance to the general election in November. Which two will be a litmus test for Seattle voters’ perceptions of the direction of their city and how they want to see the criminal legal system operate moving forward.

Seattle’s city attorney prosecutes misdemeanor crime and handles civil litigation. It’s up to the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office to handle felony matters.

The count is far from over after Tuesday night. According to the King County Department of Elections, new totals will drop weekday afternoons until all votes are counted. Voters had until 8 p.m. Tuesday night to get their ballot in. The department recommended mailing ballots no later than Friday, July 30, and using ballot drop boxes after that to ensure the vote is counted.

To check all the vote totals go to this link and click “View results.”

Seattle City Council Position 9

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

Nikkita Oliver, with 40.2% of the vote, and Sara Nelson, with 39.5%, are set to face each other in November’s general election.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Nikkita Oliver, with 40.2% of the vote, and Sara Nelson, with 39.5%, are still set to face each other in November’s general election.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Sara Nelson, with 39.5% of the vote, is still set to face Nikkita Oliver, who has increased her hold of the vote to 40.2%.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Sara Nelson, with 42.1% of the vote, is still set to face Nikkita Oliver, who has 36.5%.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Sara Nelson, with 42.78% of the vote, is still set to face Nikkita Oliver, who has 35.03%.


Sara Nelson, who is seeking a City Council position for the second time and who also once worked as a legislative aide to former Councilmember Richard Conlin, has received 42% of the vote, according to early results, and will face Nikkita Oliver, who has 35%. 

Oliver has been a prominent community activist and one of the faces of last summer’s movement to defund the Seattle Police Department (SPD). Oliver has not always seen eye-to-eye with the city government, and four years ago, they failed to win but played a prominent role in the 2017 mayoral run.

As one of the other top competitors, Nelson has focused her campaign around economic recovery and leveraging her personal experience with small businesses. At the same time, Nelson has stood against efforts such as Seattle’s JumpStart Seattle payroll tax, which taxes companies of a certain income threshold to help Seattle residents recover from the pandemic. 

In response to the initial election results, Nelson told the Emerald that she views the support she has received thus far as confirmation that residents of Seattle are looking for a change in the way issues like homelessness, public safety, and economic recovery are handled.

“I think that the results reflect maybe a lack of confidence in what the council’s been doing and hope that there can be some change,” Nelson said in a phone call. “The reason that I got into the race is that people are concerned about the direction of our city and they want change.” 

When asked how she felt about a race against Oliver, Nelson said that she “[doesn’t] make predictions” and that her methods of campaigning will remain largely the same. 

Brianna Thomas, who works as chief of staff to Council President Lorena González, received 14% of the votes. Thomas has emphasized racial and economic equality as her points of emphasis for her campaign. She has ambitions of redesigning SPD over time, while also expanding workers rights following her involvement in the secure scheduling ordinance which went into effect in 2017, to make schedules more routine and allow for breaks.

Seattle City Council Position 8

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

Current Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda, with a final result of 59.4% of the vote, is set to race against Kenneth Wilson, who finished with 16.2%, in November’s general election.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda is maintaining her percentage of the vote of 59.4%, while Kenneth Wilson is still holding around 16.2%.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda has again increased her percentage of the vote to 59.4%, while Kenneth Wilson now holds around 16.2%.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda has increased her percentage of the vote to 56%, while Kenneth Wilson still holds around 18%.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda still has roughly 55% of the votes, while Kenneth Wilson still holds 18%.


Current Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda who has been likely to advance to the general election after receiving more substantial support in terms of funding and endorsements than other competing candidates for the position, has thus far received roughly 55% of the votes. 

She will face Kenneth Wilson, who received 18% in Tuesday’s vote. Wilson, who works as a civil engineer and owns a consulting business, has specifically highlighted issues of homelessness and better infrastructure in his campaign. 

In a brief interview with the Emerald, Mosqueda expressed that she is proud of her team and the efforts thus far while also acknowledging work that she hopes to do moving forward. 

“I understand that there’s a lot of anxiety about how we recover from this crisis and you know the public health crisis that were already present before COVID like housing affordability and homelessness,” Mosqueda said. “I’m proud, I really am proud, of what we’ve done, but I know that there’s so much more to do and that’s why I’m excited to get back in there and hopefully win in November.”

Proposition No. 1: “Best Starts for Kids”

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

The proposition is set to pass with 62.7% to 37.2%.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

The proposition is still set to pass with 62.7% to 37.2%.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

The proposition is still set to pass with 62.7% to 37.2%.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

The proposition is still set to pass with 60% to 39%.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

The proposition is still set to pass with 59% to 41%.


King County voters were approving Proposition No. 1, a King County Council ordinance that would renew funding for services and programs to support children, youth, and families such as “child care, prenatal and newborn family services; youth development programs, social, emotional and mental health supports and homelessness prevention.” The proposition allows for a six-year property tax starting in 2022 of $0.19 per $1,000 of assessed value ($114 for a home assessed at $600,000) with up to 3% increases each year. The proposition was passing 59% to 41% in early returns Tuesday night.

King County Executive’s Race

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

Current County Executive Dow Constatine finished the primary election with roughly 52% of the vote, while State Sen. Joe Nguyen finished with roughly 32%. The two will continue on to November’s general election.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Current County Executive Dow Constatine still holds roughly 52% of the vote, while State Sen. Joe Nguyen continues to hold to roughly 32%.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Current County Executive Dow Constatine now holds roughly 52% of the vote, while State Sen. Joe Nguyen has increased his hold to roughly 32%.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Current County Executive Dow Constatine continues to hold roughly 53% of the vote, while State Sen. Joe Nguyen has increased his hold to roughly 30%.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Current County Executive Dow Constatine continues to hold roughly 53% of the vote, while State Sen. Joe Nguyen continues to hold roughly 29%.


According to early returns, incumbent King County Executive Dow Constantine and State Sen. Joe Nguyen will advance to the November general election with Constantine receiving 53% of Tuesday’s primary vote and Nguyen receiving 29%.

Constantine has a long resume in politics serving as a state representative and senator as well as county councilmember before his current 12-year run as county executive. The pandemic and racial reckoning from the police killing of George Floyd have created a climate ripe for change. “But the windows have been kicked wide open right now,” he told the Emerald. “And for our staff, for my allies charging through that and taking these issues to fruition, [it] is really invigorating. That is what is motivating me to want to continue this work.” 

The son of Vietnamese refugees, Nguyen grew up in White Center and learned the meaning of community when neighbors built ramps to his house after an accident left his father a quadriplegic. “I had to take the bus to get to the waterfront in order to get to my job,” he told the Emerald. “I was a janitor at my high school to help pay for tuition, and then I’d work another job on the waterfront to be able to help pay for bills around the house, where we struggled. We struggled so hard. It was because of things like TANF, the basic needs program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, that kept us stable and that kept us housed. I saw how hard it was for us growing up. But because we have the community, and we have the services that help uplift my family, we were able to be successful.” He’s an advocate of free transit to support communities and affect climate change.

King County Council District 9

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

Incumbent Councilmember Reagan Dunn, with roughly 55% of the vote, and Renton City Councilmember Kim-Khánh Vǎn, with 21.9%, are set to face each other in the November election.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Incumbent Councilmember Reagan Dunn, with 55.5% of the vote, and Renton City Councilmember Kim-Khánh Vǎn, with 21.9%, are still set to face each other in the November election.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Councilmember Reagan Dunn, with 55.5% of the vote, still looks set to face Renton City Councilmember Kim-Khánh Vǎn, who holds 21.9% of the vote.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Councilmember Reagan Dunn, with 56.5% of the vote, still looks set to face Renton City Councilmember Kim-Khánh Vǎn, who holds 21.7% of the vote.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Councilmember Reagan Dunn, with 56.6% of the vote, still looks set to face Renton City Councilmember Kim-Khánh Vǎn, who remains at roughly 21% of the vote.


Sixteen-year incumbent Councilmember Reagan Dunn advances to face Renton City Councilmember Kim-Khánh Vǎn in this November’s general election with Dunn receiving 57% of the vote and Vǎn receiving 21% of the vote.The primary contest featured newcomers including Afghan war veteran and social justice worker Chris Franco and Seattle equity development director Ubax Gardheere.

Seattle School Board District Positions 4 and 5

Update 08/18/2021, 4:30 p.m., final results:

Vivian Song Maritz maintained her hold of roughly 59.8% of the vote, while Laura Marie Rivera continued to hold 21.4%; the two will race each other in November. Michelle Sarju and Dan Harder also continued their holds of 85.8% and 10.5% respectively.


Update 08/13/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Vivian Song Maritz maintains her hold of roughly 59.8% of the vote, while Laura Marie Rivera continues to hold 21.4%. Michelle Sarju and Dan Harder also continue their holds of 85.8% and 10.5% respectively.


Update 08/10/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Vivian Song Maritz has increased her hold to roughly 59.8% of the vote, while Laura Marie Rivera holds 21.4%. Michelle Sarju’s hold has also increased to now 85.8%, while Dan Harder’s hold has continued to dip to now 10.5% but still holds enough to face Sarju in November.


Update 08/06/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Vivian Song Maritz has increased her hold to roughly 57.8% of the vote, while Laura Marie Rivera holds 22.7%. Michelle Sarju’s hold has also increased to now 83.7%, while Dan Harder’s hold has continued to dip to now 12.3% but still holds enough to face Sarju in November.


Update 08/04/2021, 4:30 p.m.:

Vivian Song Maritz continues to hold roughly 56% of the vote, while Laura Marie Rivera holds 23%. Michelle Sarju’s 82% hold remains, while Dan Harder’s hold has dipped slightly to 13.6% but still holds enough to face Sarju in November.


According to unofficial early results, Vivian Song Maritz received 56% and Laura Marie Rivera 23% of the vote to advance to the November general election for SPS School Board District 4, which represents the area for Ballard High School. Michelle Sarju received 82% and Dan Harder 14% in Tuesday’s primary to advance to the general election for SPS School Board District 5, which covers the area for Garfield High School.


Ashley Archibald is a freelance journalist with previous work in Real Change, the Santa Monica Daily Press, and the Union Democrat. Her work focuses on policy and economic development.

Elizabeth Turnbullis a journalist with reporting experience in the U.S. and the Middle East. She has a passion for covering human-centric issues and doing so consistently.

Phil Manzano is a South Seattle writer, editor with more than 30 years of experience in daily journalism in Portland, Ore. He is director of Southend Connect, a platform to support small business and build community in South Seattle.  A San Francisco native, he moved to Seattle in 2013, following his father, Aniceto “Nick” Manzano, who arrived here from The Philippines in 1929.

📸 Featured image is attributed to King County, WA (under a Creative Commons, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license).

Before you move on to the next story … Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. Support the Emerald!

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Election night 2021 results - In-depth coverage and analysis as votes are counted in all 338 ridings

Updated: 2015 election results for Seattle, King County and Washington state

Updated at 8:00 p.m. Thursday

Here are the current 2015 general election results for Seattle, King County and Washington state, along with links to background info on each race. Check back for updates and final results as they come in -- and find all of Crosscut's election coverage and and analysis here.

Note: All results are preliminary. We are skipping uncontested races.

CITY OF SEATTLE

City Council District No. 1  (Southwest Seattle, including West Seattle and South Park) — Lisa Herbold or Shannon Braddock

Results: Braddock 51.69%, Herbold 47.81%

Background: Tight council race exposes a divided West Seattle

City Council District No. 2 (Rainier Valley, Beacon Hill, Georgetown) — Bruce Harrell or Tammy Morales

Results: Harrell 53.1%, Morales 46.75%

City Council District No. 3 (Capitol Hill, Central Area, Montlake) — Kshama Sawant or Pamela Banks

Results: Sawant 53.93%, Banks 45.81%

Background: Can Pamela Banks topple the symbol of Seattle socialism?

City Council District No. 4 (Wallingford, U-District, Points East, Eastlake) — Rob Johnson or Michael Maddux

Results: Johnson 53.52%, Maddux 46.07%

City Council District No. 5 (Lake City, Northgate, Northwest Seattle) — Debora Juarez or Sandy Brown

Results: Juarez 63.8%, Brown 35.7%

Background: Who will speak for Seattle's northern frontier?

City Council District No. 6 (Green Lake, Fremont, Ballard, Crown Hill) — Mike O'Brien or Catherine Weatbrook

Results: O'Brien 60%, Weatbrook 39.6%

Background: It's Tubs girl vs. kale guy in northwest Seattle

City Council District No. 7 (Magnolia, Queen Anne, South Lake Union, Downtown) — Sally Bagshaw or Deborah Zech Artis

Results: Bagshaw 81.1%, Artis 18.2%

Background: These Seattle candidates disagreed on everything, then drove off together

City Council Position No. 8 (citywide at-large) — Tim Burgess or Jon Grant

Results: Burgess 56.9%, Grant 42.6%

Background: Council President Tim Burgess gets a run for his money from a scruffy political outsider

City Council Position No. 9 (citywide at-large) — Lorena Gonzalez or Bill Bradburd

Results: Gonzales 77.3%, Bradburd 22.3%

Background: Seattle City Council race: 2 progressives differ on growth

City of Seattle Initiative Measure No. 122 (public financing of election vouchers)

Results: Yes 61.3%, No 38.7%

City of Seattle - Proposition No. 1 (Transportation levy)

Results: Yes 57.5%, No 42.5%

SEATTLE SCHOOL DISTRICT

Seattle School Board Director District No. 1 — Michael Christophersen or Scott Pinkham

Results: Pinkham 67.7%, Christophersen 31.9%

Seattle School Board Director District No. 2 — Laura Obara Gramer or Rick Burke

Results: Burke 88.3%, Gramer 19.5%

Seattle School Board Director District No. 3 — Jill Geary or Lauren McGuire

Results: Geary 61%, McGuire 38.7%

Seattle School Board Director District No. 6 — Leslie Harris or Marty McLaren

Results: Harris 75.7%, McLaren 24%

KING COUNTY

King County Charter Amendment No. 1 Law Enforcement Oversight

Results: Yes 56.2%, No 43.7%

Background: What is the Office of Law Enforcement Oversight and why are we voting on it?

King County Proposition No. 1 Regular Property Tax Levy for Children, Youth, Families and Communities

Results: Yes 53.3%, No 46.7%

Background: King County seeks $392M for kids; critics ask, exactly for what?

King County Assessor — Lloyd Hara or John Wilson

Results: Wilson 56.4%, Hara 43.3%

Background: Two Seattle fixtures vie for the assessor’s office

King County Director of Elections Julie Wise or Zack Hudgins

Results: Wise 71.9%, Hudgins 27.8%

Background: King County Elections candidates disagree over department's performance

King County Council District No. 4 (Queen Anne, Ballard) — Rufe Orr or Jeanne Kohl-Welles 

Results: Kohl-Welles 84.7%, Orr 14.9%

King County Council District No. 6 (Bellevue, Kirkland, Mercer Island) Claudia Balducci or Jane Hague

Results: Balducci 59.6%, Hague 40.2%

Background: King County race heats up between Hague, Bellevue mayor

PORT OF SEATTLE

Port Commissioner Position No. 2 Courtney Gregoire or Goodspaceguy

Results: Gregoire 85.6%, Goodspaceguy 13.9%

Background: Goodspaceguy: The definitive interview with King County’s perennial candidate

Commissioner Position No. 5 — Fred Felleman or Marion Yoshino

Results: Felleman 56.8%, Yoshino 42.7%

Background: Port candidates focus on transparency

WASHINGTON STATE

Initiative 1366: State taxes and fees (two-thirds majority for tax increases)

Results: Yes 52.9%, No 47.1%

Votes counted: 1,211,110

Background: Court keeps Tim Eyman initiative on November ballot

Initiative 1401 Penalties for trading in products from some endangered species

Results: Yes 70.2%, No 29.8%

Votes counted: 1,217,924

Background: Ballot initiative puts "extinction economy" in the crosshairs.

Advisory ballots

Advisory Vote No. 10 Engrossed Substitute House Bill 1449 regarding oil and petroleum products taxes for oil-spill response

Results: Repealed 49.9%, Maintained 50.1%

Advisory Vote No. 11 Second Substitute Senate Bill 5052 regarding the imposition of an excise tax on medical marijuana

Results: Repealed 41.8%, Maintained 58.1%

Advisory Vote No. 12 Second Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 5987 regarding additional motor vehicle and special fuel taxes

Results: Repealed 65.8%, Maintained 34.2%

Advisory Vote No. 13 Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 6138 regarding repeal of a sales tax exemption on certain software manufacturers and an increase of a business and occupation tax

Results: Repealed 64.7%, Maintained 35.3%

State Representative Legislative District 30 (Federal Way and surrounding areas) — Teri Hickel or Carol Gregory

Results: Hickel 54.8%, Gregory 45.4%

Background: 30th District race poses new worries for legislative Democrats

Sours: https://crosscut.com/2015/11/2015-election-results-for-seattle-king-county-and-washington-state

2015 results county elections king

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Thomas Tobin


Thomas Tobin was a 2015 candidate for the Position 9 seat on the Seattle City Council in Washington. The primary election took place on August 4, 2015.

Elections

2015

See also: Seattle, Washington municipal elections, 2015

The city of Seattle, Washington, held elections for city council on November 3, 2015. A primary took place on August 4, 2015. The filing deadline for candidates who wished to run in this election was May 15, 2015. All nine council seats were up for election.[1][2] In the Position 9 race, Bill Bradburd and M. Lorena González advanced past Alon Bassok, Omari Tahir-Garrett, Thomas Tobin and Alex Tsimerman in the primary election on August 4, 2015. González defeated Bradburd in the general election.[3]

Seattle City Council Position 9, General election, 2015
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngM. Lorena González78.1%128,588
Bill Bradburd21.4%35,293
Write-in votes0.51%844
Total Votes164,725
Source:King County, Washington, "City of Seattle Council Position No. 9", accessed November 3, 2015.

Seattle City Council Position 9 Primary Election, 2015
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngM. Lorena González65%77,839
Green check mark transparent.pngBill Bradburd14.9%17,895
Alon Bassok9.1%10,946
Thomas Tobin7.8%9,361
Omari Tahir-Garrett1.5%1,854
Alex Tsimerman1.2%1,470
Write-in 0.3%344
Total Votes117,895
Source:King County Elections, "Official primary election results," accessed August 12, 2015

Recent news

The link below is to the most recent stories in a Google news search for the terms Thomas Tobin Seattle. These results are automatically generated from Google. Ballotpedia does not curate or endorse these articles.

See also

External links

  1. City of Seattle, "Law, Rules and Information for Filers," accessed September 19, 2014
  2. City of Seattle, "Seattle City Council Districts," accessed December 31, 2014
  3. King County Elections, "Official primary election results," accessed August 12, 2015
Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Thomas_Tobin
King County Vote Centers Are Open

Results from Washington's top 2021 primary election races

Incumbent Dow Constantine and State Sen. Joe Nguyen are leading the primary race for King County executive.

An initial round of election returns was released shortly after 8 p.m. on election day. These returns are from ballots that were turned in early and tabulated. 

Counties will release additional results in the days after the election as more ballots are counted. Additional results are typically released daily.

The top two candidates in the primary move on to the November general election.

The County Canvassing Boards will certify primary election results August 17, and the Secretary of State will certify results August 20.

Complete election results are posted at king5.com/elections. 

King County executive

Incumbent Dow Constantine is leading the race after the latest ballot count with 53% of the vote.

State Sen. Joe Nguyen, thought to be Constantine's first serious challenger in years, is trailing with 32% of the vote.

Constantine hasn't faced a serious challenge since 2009 when he was first elected over former TV anchor Susan Hutchison. 

Constantine is seeking his fourth term as county executive. If elected, he will be the longest-serving executive for King County since the current governance system was adopted in the 1960s.

Bill Hirt follows Nguyen with 11%, then Goodspaceguy with nearly 3% and Johnathon Crines with 2%.

The county executive is the highest elected official to serve the residents of King County.

King County's Proposition 1

King County Prop. No. 1's approval rating held at 62% following the latest ballot count Aug. 6.

King County Proposition No. 1 would not only renew a property-tax levy approved by voters in 2015 but also increase the amount owners would pay. Taxpayers would see an increase from 14 cents per $1,000 assessed value to 19 cents per $1,000 for six years.

It would cost $114 for a property with an assessed value of $600,000.

Seattle mayor

Former Seattle City Council President Bruce Harrell is leading in the primary mayor race for the city.

Harrell kept his lead Friday after the fourth round of ballots were counted with 35% of the vote.

M. Lorena González, who was elected to the city council in 2015 and began serving as council president in 2020, has 31% of the vote.

Colleen Echohawk is trailing with 10% of the vote, followed by Jessyn Farrell with 7%. 

Tacoma mayor

Incumbent Victoria Woodards has a strong lead in the primary mayoral race.

After the latest ballot count, Woodards has 52% of the vote.

Steve Haverly trails with 32% of the vote, followed by Jamika Scott, with 16% of the vote.

Woodards has been mayor since 2018.

The mayor of Tacoma serves a four-year term.

Seattle City Council

Incumbent Teresa Mosqueda held her lead in the primary race for Seattle City Council Position 8 after another round of ballots were counted Friday.

Mosqueda has 59% of the vote.

Trailing is Kenneth Wilson with 17% of the vote, followed by Kate Martin with 12% of the vote. 

Mosqueda was elected to the council in 2017 as a first-time candidate with nearly 60% of the vote.

Sara Nelson and Nikkita Oliver held their lead in the primary race for position 9 on the Seattle City Council Friday.

Nelson leads with 40% of votes, followed by Oliver with 39% of the vote.

Nelson, the co-owner of Fremont Brewing, ran against Mosqueda in 2017, and said she decided to run to help "get the city back on track," and wants to get the voice of a small business owner on the council. 

Attorney and civic activist Nikkita Oliver, who ran for Seattle mayor in 2017, says on their campaign website that "meeting basic needs is a baseline for community safety." 

Seattle city attorney

Incumbent Pete Holmes conceded the race for Seattle city attorney after trailing behind challengers Nicole Thomas-Kennedy and Ann Davison in his effort to be re-elected.

As of Friday afternoon, Thomas-Kennedy led with 36% of the vote.

Davison is trailing Thomas-Kennedy with 33% of the vote. Holmes was close behind with 31% but is unlikely to bridge the gap after the remaining ballots are counted. 

King County Council

Three King County Council members face competition for their positions – District 3, 7 and 9.

District 3 incumbent Kathy Lambert is leading the race to represent the largest district, covering nearly half of King County.

Lambert currently holds 41% of the vote, followed by Sarah Perry with 35% and Joe Cohen with 24%.

Lambert, who rarely faces tough competition, is seeking her sixth term. She was elected in 2001 with about 64% of the vote. She ran unopposed for three elections. She was elected again for a fifth term in 2017.

District 7 incumbent Pete Von Reichbauer has a strong lead in his effort to advance to the general election.

Von Reichbauer leads with 53% of the vote, followed by Lydia Assefa-Dawson and Dominique Torgerson who each have 17%, and Saudia J. Abdullah with 13%.

Von Reichbauer, running for his eighth term, was elected to the county council in 1993 and ran unopposed in the past three elections.

Incumbent Reagan Dunn is leading the primary race as he seeks to get his name on the ballot for November's general election.

Dunn holds 56% of the vote.

Kim-Khanh Van is trailing with 22% of the vote, followed by Chris Franco with 16% and Ubax Gardheere, with 6%.

Dunn was appointed to the council in 2005 after Rob McKenna was elected to state attorney general. He has since been re-elected and is now seeking a fourth term to represent a large portion of southeast King County.

Sours: https://www.king5.com/article/news/politics/elections/results-from-washingtons-top-2021-primary-races/281-2ecfd766-d373-484e-b20c-3e836a995cbe

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District 2

Three seatson the Federal Way Public SchoolsBoard of Directors were up for general electionon November 3, 2015. Members were elected by district with only registered voters of their geographic zones eligible to vote in those races.

District 2 incumbent Claire Wilson, District 3 incumbent Danny Peterson and District 5 incumbent Hiroshi Eto's seats were up for election. Wilson defeated challenger Angela Griffin.[1]

Peterson did not file for re-election. Liz Drake won the open District 3 seat unopposed. District 5 incumbent Eto also was victorious in his unopposed re-election bid.[1]

About the district

See also: Federal Way Public Schools, Washington
Federal Way Public Schools is located in King County, Wash.
Federal Way Public Schools is located in King Countyin northwestern Washington. The county seat is Seattle. King County was home to an estimated 2,044,449 residents in 2013, according to the United States Census Bureau.[2]In the 2012-2013 school year, Federal Way Public Schools was the eighth-largest school districtin Washington, serving 22,231 students.[3]

Demographics

In 2013, King County outperformed the state of Washington as a whole in terms of higher education achievement, median household income and poverty rate. The United States Census Bureau found that 46.6 percent of county residents aged 25 and older had earned a bachelor's degree or higher, while the rate was 31.9 percent for state residents. The median household income was $71,811 in the county in comparison to $59,478 statewide. The rate of persons living below the poverty line in King County was 11.5 percent compared to 13.4 percent for Washington.[2]

Racial Demographics, 2013[2]
Race King County (%) Washington (%)
White 70.8 81.2
Black or African American 6.6 4.0
American Indian and Alaska Native 1.1 1.9
Asian 15.9 7.9
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0.80.7
Two or More Races 4.84.4
Hispanic or Latino 9.311.9
Presidential Voting Pattern, King County[4]
Year Democratic Vote (%) Republican Vote (%)
2012 68.7 28.3
2008 70.0 28.0
2004 65.0 33.7
2000 60.0 34.4

Note: Percentages for race and ethnicity may add up to more than 100 percent because respondents may report more than one race and the Hispanic/Latino ethnicity may be selected in conjunction with any race. Read more about race and ethnicity in the census here.

Voter and candidate information

The Federal Way Public Schools Board of Education consists of five members elected by district to four-year terms. If more than two candidates filed for any one position up for election, a primary election was held on August 4, 2015. The general election for Districts 2, 3 and 5 was November 3, 2015.

Elections in Washington require candidates to pay filing fees equal to 1 percent of a position's annual salary. Board members in Federal Way can be reimbursed up to $4,800 for district activities but do not receive salaries, which eliminates the filing fee.[5] Candidates were required to file for this election by May 15, 2015.

Elections

2015

Results

Federal Way Public Schools Board of Directors , District 2 General Election, 4-year term, 2015
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngClaire WilsonIncumbent51.4%9,519
Angela Griffin48.1%8,911
Write-in votes0.49%90
Total Votes18,520
Source:King County Elections, "Election Results: General and Special Elections November 4, 2015," November 24, 2015

Candidates

Results

Federal Way Public Schools Board of Directors , District 3 General Election, 4-year term, 2015
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngLiz Drake98.9%15,759
Write-in votes1.08%172
Total Votes15,931
Source:King County Elections, "Election Results: General and Special Elections November 4, 2015," November 24, 2015

Candidates

Results

Federal Way Public Schools Board of Directors , District 5 General Election, 4-year term, 2015
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngHiroshi Eto98.9%15,183
Write-in votes1.13%173
Total Votes15,356
Source:King County Elections, "Election Results: General and Special Elections November 4, 2015," November 24, 2015

Candidates

Campaign finance

No contributions or expenditures were reported as of October 29, 2015, according to the Washington Public Disclosure Commission.[6]

Candidates who raised and spent no more than $5,000 in aggregate and who did not receive more than $500 from any one contributor, including themselves, could participate in "mini reporting." These candidates were required to file a candidate registration statement and keep a record of their contributors and expenditures, but they were not required to report them unless they exceed the stated thresholds. In those cases, they were required to switch their filing status from "mini" to "full" reporting by August 31, 2015.[7]

Contributions to school board candidate committees were subject to the following limits:[7]

  • State parties or caucus political committees (separately): $0.95 per registered voter from January 1 to December 31
  • County and legislative district parties (combined): $0.50 per registered voter from January 1 to December 31
  • Individuals, PACS, unions, corporations or other entities (separately): $950 per primary and general election

School board candidate committees were prohibited from receiving contributions from other candidate committees. No contributors except state committees of political parties could give more than $5,000 in aggregate in the 21 days prior to the election.[7]

Past elections

Information about earlier elections can be found by clicking [show] at the right.

 

2013

See also: Federal Way Public Schools elections (2013)
District 1
Federal Way Public Schools,
District 1 General Election, 4-year term, 2013
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngGeoffery Z. McAnalloy52.7%10,733
    Nonpartisan Ed BarneyIncumbent46.8%9,528
    Nonpartisan Write-in votes 0.5%93
Total Votes20,354
Source:King County Elections, "Results," November 25, 2013
District 4
General
Federal Way Public Schools,
District 4 General Election, 4-year term, 2013
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngCarol Gregory52.5%10,812
    Nonpartisan Medgar Wells47.1%9,703
    Nonpartisan Write-in votes 0.5%96
Total Votes20,611
Source:King County Elections, "Results," November 25, 2013
Primary
Federal Way Public Schools,
District 4 Primary Election, 4-year term, 2013
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngCarol Gregory44.2%5,981
    Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngMedgar Wells38.3%5,181
    Nonpartisan Kenneth Lance Barton17.6%2,381
Total Votes13,543
Source:King County Elections, "August 6, Primary Election Results," August 20, 2013

2011

District 2
Federal Way Public Schools,
District 2 General Election, 4-year term, 2011
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngClaire Wilson65.7%14,595
    Nonpartisan Gail Crabtree 34.3%7,620
Total Votes22,215
Source:King County Elections, "November 8, 2011 General Election," November 29, 2011
District 3
Federal Way Public Schools,
District 3 General Election, 4-year term, 2011
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngDanny Peterson50.9%11,518
    Nonpartisan Elizabeth Drake 49.1%11,095
Total Votes22,613
Source:King County Elections, "November 8, 2011 General Election," November 29, 2011
District 5
Federal Way Public Schools,
District 5 General Election, 4-year term, 2011
PartyCandidateVote %Votes
    Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngTony Moore97.8%19,529
    Nonpartisan Write-in votes 2.2%435
Total Votes19,964
Source:King County Elections, "November 8, 2011 General Election," November 29, 2011

Key deadlines

The following dates were key deadlines for the 2015 Washington school board elections:[8][9]

Deadline Event
May 11-15, 2015Candidate filing period
May 18, 2015Deadline for candidates to withdraw
July 14, 2015Pre-primary campaign finance report due
July 27, 2015Voter registration deadline for primary election
July 28, 2015Pre-primary campaign finance report due
August 4, 2015Primary election day, if necessary
September 10, 2015Post-primary campaign finance report due
October 13, 2015Pre-general campaign finance report due
October 26, 2015Voter registration deadline for general election
October 27, 2015Pre-general campaign finance report due
November 3, 2015General Election Day
November 24, 2015Election results certified
December 10, 2015Post-general campaign finance report due
January 11, 2016End of election cycle campaign finance report due

Recent news

The link below is to the most recent stories in a Google news search for the terms Federal Way Public Schools Washington. These results are automatically generated from Google. Ballotpedia does not curate or endorse these articles.

See also

External links

  1. 1.01.1King County Elections, "2015 Official Candidate Filing," accessed May 26, 2015
  2. 2.02.12.2United States Census Bureau, "State & County QuickFacts: King County, Washington," accessed January 23, 2015
  3. National Center for Education Statistics, "ELSI Table Generator," accessed April 22, 2015
  4. King County Elections, "Election Archive," accessed September 24, 2013
  5. King County Elections, "Candidate Manual," accessed August 12, 2013
  6. Washington Public Disclosure Commission, "Search the Database: Local Candidates," accessed October 29, 2015
  7. 7.07.17.2Washington Public Disclosure Commission, "Mini Campaign Reporting Disclosure Instructions," June 2014
  8. Clark County Elections, "2015 Elections Calendar," accessed January 23, 2015
  9. Washington Public Disclosure Commission, "2015 Key Reporting Dates for Candidates," accessed January 23, 2015
Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Federal_Way_Public_Schools_elections_(2015)


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