Mo birth and death records

Mo birth and death records DEFAULT

Missouri

Birth

Event: Birth

Cost of copy: $15.00

Address:
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Bureau of Vital Records
930 Wildwood
P.O. Box 570
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570

Remarks: State office has records since January 1910. Certified copies of most Missouri birth and death records are also available from local county health department or the Recorder of Deeds in St. Louis City. For details, please contact these offices directly. If event occurred in St. Louis (City), St. Louis County, or Kansas City before 1910, write to the city or county Health Department. Copies of these records are $15.00 each.

Personal check or money order should be made payable to Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. Please include a legal size self-addressed stamped envelope. To verify current fees on birth and death records, the telephone number is (573) 751-6387. Information on how to obtain certified copies is also available via the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Vital Records websiteExternal.

A valid photo ID is required for walk-in applicants. A signature is required. Notarized requests are required for mail-in orders. Notary date must be the same as the date of application.

Death

Event: Death

Cost of copy: $13.00

Address:
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Bureau of Vital Records
930 Wildwood
P.O. Box 570
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570

Remarks: State office has records since January 1910. Certified copies of most Missouri birth and death records are also available from local county health department or the Recorder of Deeds in St. Louis City. For details, please contact these offices directly. If event occurred in St. Louis (City), St. Louis County, or Kansas City before 1910, write to the city or county Health Department. Copies of these records are $13.00 each. Additional copies of the same record ordered at the same time are $10.00.

Personal check or money order should be made payable to Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. Please include a legal size self-addressed stamped envelope. To verify current fees on birth and death records, the telephone number is (573) 751-6387. Information on how to obtain certified copies is also available via the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Vital Records websiteExternal.

A valid photo ID is required for walk-in applicants. A signature is required. Notarized requests are required for mail-in orders. Notary date must be the same as the date of application.

Marriage

Event: Marriage (County)

Cost of copy: $15.00

Address: See remarks

Remarks: Reports of marriage records are on file from July 1948 to the present.

Certified copies of Missouri marriage records are also available from the county recorder of deeds where the marriage license was obtained. For details, please contact these offices directly. Certified copies of reports of marriage records are $15.00 each.

Personal check or money order should be made payable to Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. Please include a self-addressed stamped envelope. To verify current fees on marriage records, the telephone number is (573) 751-6387. Information on how to obtain certified copies is also available via the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Vital Records websiteExternal.

A valid photo ID is required for walk-in applicants. A signature is required. Notarized requests are required for mail-in orders. Notary date must be the same as the date of application.

Divorce

Event: Divorce (County)

Cost of copy: $15.00

Address: See remarks

Remarks: Reports of divorce records are on file from July 1948 to the present.

Certified copies of Missouri divorce records are also available from the county circuit clerk where the divorce was granted. For details, please contact these offices directly. Certified copies of reports of divorce records are $15.00 each.

Personal check or money order should be made payable to Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. Please include a self-addressed stamped envelope. To verify current fees on divorce records, the telephone number is (573) 751-6387. Information on how to obtain certified copies is also available via the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Vital Records websiteExternal.

A valid photo ID is required for walk-in applicants. A signature is required. Notarized requests are required for mail-in orders. Notary date must be the same as the date of application.

Sours: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/w2w/missouri.htm

The Missouri Birth Index

A free searchable database of 7,501,974 births registered in the state of Missouri between 1920-2015

Start Your Free Search

1910-1920 and 2016-2019 data coming soon!

Tips and Tricks

  • All fields are optional, only fill out as much as you know. Less is more.
  • Common nicknames are automatically searched. For example, a search for the given name Bill will also bring up results for William, Will, Billy, etc., and Rebecca will find Becky, Beckie, Rivka, etc.
  • You can use an asterisk (*) as a wildcard character to search for partial names. For example, a surname search for *berg will match surnames like Greenberg and Eisenberg, or a search for a given name like Jo* will match Joanna, Joseph, JoJo, etc. You can also use a wildcard in the middle of a name, like K*m to find Kareem, Kettleman, Keenam, etc. Note that the soundalike name suggestions will not be as precise if you are using wildcards in your search.

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Given NameMiddle NameSurnameDate of Birth

Order a Missouri birth certificate

Now that you've found someone listed in the Missouri Birth Index, here's how you can order a copy of the actual birth certificate.

Order from the Locality

Short FormFaster

"Short form" Missouri birth certificates can be ordered from local public health agencies, usually at the county level. Some, but not all, of these agencies offer online ordering through their department websites. See the list of contact information on the Missouri DHSS website.

Ordering vital records from a local public health agency is usually a faster way to get a record than by going to the state, but it does require you to already know which locality (town, city, county) holds the record you want.

Order from the State

Short FormLong FormSlower

Both "long form" and "short form" certified copies of birth certificates can be ordered directly from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) in in Jefferson City, Missouri. They accept mailed-in applications (with proper notarized statement), or you can call them to make an in-person appointment.

You may need to include a "tangible interest document" or signed notarized statement authorizing release of the record.

Read the Missouri DHSS website for full information about how to place an order with them.

Order from VitalChek

Short FormLong FormFastestExpensive

You can also order a copy of a Missouri birth certificate from the VitalChek website, which is run by Lexis-Nexis, or by calling them to place an order over the phone. They even offer overnight shipping.

However, VitalChek adds on a substantial shipping and processing fee to all vital records orders, not just the overnighted ones. And after placing your order, you may still need to fax them your "tangible interest document" or notarized statement. They are a third party commercial vendor, not a government agency.

Who can get a certificate?

In Missouri, only the registrant (the person named on the birth certificate), a member of his/her family, his/her guardian, or one of their official representatives shall be considered to have a direct and tangible interest and may be issued a certified copy of a vital record such as a birth certificate. Immediate family members can include those family members and in-laws in the direct line of descent up to, but not including, cousins. Official representatives can include an attorney, physician, or other authorized agent acting on behalf of the registrant or his/her family. Official representatives need to demonstrate a link between themselves and the registrant on the vital record or qualified family member.

Read the Missouri Code of State Regulations - 19 CSR 10-10 or check out the detailed examples on the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) website for more information.

This demo shows a smoothed area chart with an x-axis plot band highlighting an area of interest at the last two points. Plot bands and plot lines are commonly used to draw attention to certain areas or thresholds.

See a name's popularity through time in Missouri

Want to see a particular given name's waxing and waning popularity over time? Enter a common (or uncommon) given name like "Mary" or "Esther" or "Jack" or "Rudolph" in the box above, and hit enter. You'll see a graph of the popularity for just that one name, taken from the past century of Missouri birth data.

You can also use an asterisk to do wildcard searches. For example, a search on "Jen*" will return the sum of results for the names Jennifer, Jenny, Jenson, etc.

Try your own name, too!

About the Missouri Birth Index

The state of Missouri wasted over $200,000 in taxpayer funds trying to prevent the release of this public information, and the creation of this website. It took a four-year court case to make them follow the law.

In February 2016, the non-profit activist group Reclaim The Records asked the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) for a copy of the state birth index and state death index, by making two requests under the Missouri Sunshine Law.

Initially, it didn't seem like these would be difficult or controversial requests. This basic index data, just names and dates of people who were born or died in the state, were explicitly declared to be open to the public under Missouri state law, not restricted. The information was already in text format, stored in a big state database. DHSS had provided small subsets of the same kind of data to many other requesters before, including journalists, for decades.

All that DHSS needed to do was create an invoice for the requests, using the actual number of hours that a DHSS staffer would need to spend working on them, billed at that employee's usual hourly rate. Then DHSS would ask for and receive payment. And then they would send over the files, either electronically or on a USB drive.

And that would have been the end of it. But that's not what happened.

Screenshot of Missouri law
Screenshot of e-mail from former Missouri State Registrar Garland Land

E-mail from former Missouri State Registrar Garland Land, obtained during lawsuit discovery, where he advises DHSS staff to break the Missouri Sunshine Law, first by illegally denying data access without a proper justification, and then by trying to change existing state law to prevent anyone from ever accessing the data again.

DHSS knew that Reclaim The Records wanted to put the full state index, almost a century of data, online for free public use, for the first time ever. (That would be this website here!)

But if that happened, it would also mean that DHSS probably wouldn't be able to make any more money selling subsets of that same data over and over in future years, which was revenue that normally would have gone right back into their agency budget.

So DHSS concocted what Judge Patricia S. Joyce would later call "The Secret Plan to Deny the Sunshine Law Requests".

DHSS staff e-mailed the recently retired State Registrar of Missouri, Garland Land, and asked him for advice about the data requests.

Land brazenly advised them to break the Sunshine Law.

And DHSS followed Land's illegal plan completely. Missouri decided to manufacture an absurdly high price estimate for the data extracts, hoping that would make Reclaim The Records give up on their requests and go away, leaving DHSS free to continue selling this legally-unrestricted public data as a monopoly.

DHSS shamelessly quoted an estimate of nearly $1.5 million dollars for the production of the two simple data extracts.

And just as Land had suggested, DHSS then tried to use the ensuing months of delay and legal wrangling as an opportunity to try to ram a new bill through the Missouri state legislature, changing the existing open law and locking up the data forever.

(The actual cost for the data was eventually declared by Judge Joyce to be only 0.17% of that estimate, about $2500. And to their credit, the Missouri General Assembly refused DHSS' request to change the law.)

Screenshot of original cost estimate sent by Missouri DHSS

So Reclaim The Records sued the state of Missouri

And to make a long story short, we kicked their ass in court.

LETTER FROM RECLAIM THE RECORDS TO THE MO DEPT OF HEALTH AND SENIOR SERVICES (AUGUST 24, 2016)

LETTER FROM RECLAIM THE RECORDS TO THE MO DEPT OF HEALTH AND SENIOR SERVICES

AUGUST 24, 2016

Our attorney responded to the Department's letter, wherein he helpfully pointed out to them that they were breaking the law. He also warned them that we would be filing a lawsuit if they did not comply with the Sunshine Law. But the state never bothered to respond, nor refute any of the letter.

RECLAIM THE RECORDS VS. MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SENIOR SERVICES (NOVEMBER 23, 2016)

RECLAIM THE RECORDS VS. MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SENIOR SERVICES

NOVEMBER 23, 2016

Having received no answer to our attorney's letter, we filed in court against the Department in the Circuit Court of Cole County, Missouri on November 23, 2016. The case was bounced around to at least five different Missouri Assistant Attorneys General before finally being decided.

JUDGE'S ORDER FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT (APRIL 15, 2020)

JUDGE'S ORDER FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT IN FAVOR OF RECLAIM THE RECORDS

APRIL 15, 2020

We won! Here's the judge's acceptance of our motion for summary judgment. We won the records. We won over a hundred thousand dollars in attorneys fees. And we even won $12,000 in fines, for four separate "knowing" and "purposeful" instances of Missouri DHSS breaking the law.

Read more details about our win, and some fun commentary, from our newsletter...

...and check out how the press covered our case!

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Did you find this website helpful? If so, please help us bring even more public data back to the public.

Who made this website?

We're Reclaim The Records, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in 2015, made up of genealogists, historians, researchers, journalists, and teachers. We use Freedom of Information requests to acquire and publish archival data sets, public records that have never before been available, or not available online.

We focus on government agencies, archives, and libraries that have previously been unwilling to share their data. And if they don't follow the law, we file lawsuits to make them turn over the records. As of September 2020, our organization has filed nine lawsuits (so far) against government agencies large and small, with six suits settled in our favor and three still pending.

We put all the data we win online for free public use, without usage restrictions. After all, our taxes already paid for it and it belongs to all of us.

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This data is in the public domain. There are no usage restrictions or copyrights attached to it. Feel free to use it however you'd like. But if you put it on your website or republish it, Reclaim The Records would appreciate a little reference or note in your "about this database" source box, and/or a link back to our website, just to acknowledge the work and initiative that went into researching and releasing these records back to the public.

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If you have any questions or issues, please reach out to us at [email protected].

Thank You

Thank you to our wonderful, intrepid, and diligent attorneys, Bernie Rhodes and Taryn Nash of Missouri law firm Lathrop GPM. We think they were clearly worth every penny, even though the state of Missouri got a little pissy about paying their fees.

Thank you to the Freedom of Information nerds on the FOI-L Listserv for helping us find that excellent legal counsel in the first place. Thank you to MuckRock for helping us learn about the Missouri Sunshine Law and allowing us to file our original requests online.

And most of all, thank you to our long-time supporters and donors. Your generosity and cheerleading enables us to keep reclaiming these records!

Sours: https://www.missouribirthindex.com/
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Missouri does not have a basic genealogical birth index available to the public for any year after 1910. But in early 2016, Reclaim The Records discovered that Missouri’s state Vital Statistics law actually may allow for the publication of basic birth index data, even though they have not done so in the past. So in February 2016, we filed a request under the Missouri Sunshine Law to get that birth index released to the public:

Subject: Missouri Sunshine Law Request: Request for the Missouri birth index, 1910-2015

To Whom It May Concern:

Pursuant to the Missouri Sunshine Law and the Missouri Public Records Law, I am making a public records request.

Missouri’s statute concerning Vital Statistics states in Section 193.245.1:

“It shall be unlawful for any person to permit inspection of, or to disclose information contained in, vital records or to copy or issue a copy of all or part of any such record except as authorized by this law and by regulation or by order of a court of competent jurisdiction or in the following situations:

(1) A listing of persons who are born or who die on a particular date may be disclosed upon request, but no information from the record other than the name and the date of such birth or death shall be disclosed;”

(Online reference: http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/stathtml/19300002451.html)

Based on that statute, I would like to order such a listing, covering all persons born in the state of Missouri between January 1, 1910 and December 31, 2015, inclusive. Please note that this is a request for just the basic index to the births, and is not a request for any actual birth certificates. If it is possible, I ask that the Department of Health and Senior Services also include each person’s sex and birth certificate number as part of the data in the index.

The requested documents will be made available to the general public, and this request is not being made for commercial purposes.

In the event that there are fees, I would be grateful if you would inform me of the total charges in advance of fulfilling my request. I would prefer the request filled electronically, by e-mail attachment if available or CD-ROM if not.

Thank you in advance for your anticipated cooperation in this matter. I look forward to receiving your response to this request within 3 business days, as the statute requires.

Despite a three-day reply deadline under the Missouri Sunshine Law, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services didn’t actually follow up with us about this records request until late April 2016. They eventually confirmed to us that our request was lawful, and that we could receive the records we sought. They also confirmed that the data existed in database format.

They did let us know that while statewide vital records registration was supposed to have started in 1910, in reality there was only incomplete information in their database system until about 1920, and so our request might only be able to start in 1920, with possible scattered birth data for earlier years, for some areas of the state. We said okay and agreed to amend the years of our request.

However, we then ran into two problems with the agency:

  1. A problem of format
    The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services told us that even though the records we sought do exist in native database format, they wanted to provide the records to us in their “usual” format, which meant having one of their staff members request certain days of data from the database, print out the results onto paper, and then scan the paper into a compiled PDF format.Besides being a ridiculous waste of the agency’s time, money, and paper, this is also a clear violation of the Missouri Sunshine Law, which states that if records are already available in certain format (paper, microfilm, database, etc.), an agency must make copies of the records available in that same format.
  2. A problem of calculating the actual costs
    The Department has apparently been using this birth and death data for years as a revenue source, charging researchers and scientists for access to birth and death index data by the day, rather than making all of the records open data. Therefore, the Department wanted to charge us not for the couple of hours of work required to do a one-time database dump to a USB drive, but rather charge us for each day of content we were requesting. Since we were asking for all Missouri birth index records from January 1, 1920 through December 31, 2015, they pretended that it would cost us $976,649.28 (23,376 hours at $41.78/hour). (In case you were wondering, 23,376 hours is more than two and a half years of work, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It is also absurd.) This is also a clear violation of the Missouri Sunshine Law, which has found that an agency cannot charge by the record. See R.L. Polk & Co. v. Missouri Department of Revenue, 309 S.W.3d 881 (Mo. App. W.D. 2010).
Screenshot of the initial estimated costs of our Missouri Sunshine Law requests

No, really, this is a screenshot of what they tried to tell us it would cost to get copies of these public records.

At this point, in late June 2016, we sighed heavily and finally retained legal counsel, Bernie Rhodes of Lathrop & Gage, and we started conducting all of our communications with the Department through him. He talked to their General Counsel on the phone, who claimed to him that the Department’s IT staff simply could not do a single database dump as we asked, and would have to search each individual day’s worth of records, one by one. This, she said, was because they had a very old mainframe that ran “SAS” which could not handle a date range query. Very sorry, but just not possible.

We were dubious.

Reclaim The Records then, on our own, called up SAS’ tech support phone number and confirmed with their engineers that this was actually an extremely easy database query to do, which is just what we had suspected. We contacted the Department and let them know this. Additionally, our attorney pointed out to them that there were several reports and graphs on the Department’s own website that had clearly been created with this exact same type of simple date range query.

When confronted with this evidence, the Department’s General Counsel sent a new e-mail to our attorney on August 1, 2016. In it, she admitted the cost for the birth records query would actually be something like $3,008.16 — a huge discount on their previous price for the records.

But even that wasn’t fully accurate. To get to that $3k figure, the Department was still estimating the cost based on one search per year, rather than one single search to encompass multiple years of data. The General Counsel wrote that she would be seeking a clarification to reduce the estimate, if possible.

But then all of a sudden, on August 9, 2016, the Department sent out a new letter and, for the first time, declared that they would not produce the records and not comply with the Missouri Sunshine Law at all. They claimed that providing the information would be too invasive, and claimed to have the ability to withhold records at their discretion.

We wrote back a rather strongly worded response to that. We explained that this was not a legally defensible position for the Department to take. We cited caselaw.

And they ignored it and never responded to that latter, or to us, again.

So, on Wednesday, November 23, 2016, the day before Thanksgiving, we filed our Missouri Sunshine Law suit in the Circuit Court of Cole County, Missouri. We are asking for the records, at the actual cost of producing them, meaning with a single date range query, plus the cost of the USB stick. If they really need to bring in specialized IT contractor for a few hours to make all that happen, we would cover his costs, too.

But that’s not all. Missouri’s Sunshine Law allows for people making records requests to seek and receive reimbursement of their legal fees, if an agency wrongly withholds records, or denies providing them in an available format, or wrongly calculates the copying fees. So we’re asking for our attorneys fees.

And Missouri is also one of the rare states whose open records law allows for the possibility of fines if they purposely withhold records from the public, up to $5,000 per request. So we’re asking for fines too.

Reclaim The Records vs. Missouri DHSS - E-mail from Former Missouri State Registrar Garland Land

When we got a trove of their e-mails in discovery, we found one from the former Missouri State Registrar Garland Land, who blatantly advised DHSS to break the Missouri Sunshine Law by only responding with “mounds of paper” rather than the database version required by the Sunshine Law, and to also make us request each date individually, rather than a date range. He also advised DHSS to “require [Reclaim The Records] to take you to court”, and simultaneously advised trying to get DHSS to change the law in the state legislature! Which they did try, so far unsuccessfully.

We’ve posted the relevant documents in the “Paperwork and Court Filings” tab on this page, ranging from letters to transcripts of depositions to affidavits to our motion for summary judgment. We hope you’ll enjoy reading them. More will be posted as they come in.

You can follow the progress of this request in realtime through Missouri Case.net, which is the Missouri court system tracking website, or by watching the MuckRock page.

SEE ALSO: Records Request #7 for the Missouri Death Index, 1968-2015

Sours: https://www.reclaimtherecords.org/records-request/6/
Requesting Birth \u0026 Death Records

Missouri Vital Records

Introduction to Missouri Vital Records[edit | edit source]

Vital Records consist of births, adoptions, marriages, divorces, and deaths recorded on registers, certificates, and documents. United States Vital Records has additional research guidance on researching and using vital records. A copy or an extract of most original records can be purchased from the Missouri Vital Records State Department of Health or the County Clerk's office of the county where the event occurred.

Vital Records Reference Dates[edit | edit source]

Missouri's civil records start the following years:


BirthCounty MarriagesDeath
Earliest
Began when county organized
Statewide Registration 1883-1893, then 1909 1881 1883-1893, then 1909
General Compliance 1927 1881 1911

Brief History of Vital Records in Missouri[edit | edit source]

In 1883, the Missouri General Assembly enacted legislation providing for the Board of Health to have supervision of the statewide registration of births and deaths. This supervision amounted to prescribing “such forms and recommend[ing] such legislation as shall be deemed necessary for a thorough and complete registration of vital and mortuary statistics through the state.” (Laws of the State of Missouri, 1883, page 96/section 7) The State Board of Health was charged with preparing printed forms of certificates of births and deaths; these were to be provided to the clerks of the various counties and it was the duty of the county clerks to furnish the printed forms to the persons required to file birth and death reports.

This law did not make the reporting of all births and deaths mandatory. Due to non-compliance, the General Assembly repealed the statutes relating to the registration of births and deaths in Missouri in 1893.

It was not until 1910 that the General Assembly again provided for the registration of births and deaths on a statewide basis. Approved May 6, 1909, the act was to “provide for the immediate registration of all births and deaths throughout the state of Missouri by means of certificates of births and deaths and burial or removal permits; requiring prompt returns to the central bureau of vital statistics at the capital of the state, as required to be established by the state board of health, and to insure the thorough organization and efficiency of the registration of vital statistics throughout the state, and providing certain penalties” (Laws of the State of Missouri, 1909, page 538). Pursuant to this 1909 law, all births and deaths that occur in Missouri are reported to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The Bureau of Vital Records maintains these birth and death records.

Missouri Birth, Marriage and Death Records Online[edit | edit source]

The following is a list of online resources useful for locating Missouri Vital Records which consist of births, adoptions, marriages, divorces, and deaths. Check Missouri Vital Records Online for more information about the resources listed below. Most online resources for Missouri Vital Records are indexes. After locating a person in an index always consult the original record to confirm the information in the index.

Online databases:
Births:

  • 1817-1939Missouri Births, 1817-1939 at FamilySearch — index
  • 1863-1910 Recorder of Deeds, County Clerk, or Circuit Clerk in the county where the birth occured.
  • Pre-1910Missouri Birth Records Database, Pre-1910 at Missouri State Archives — Index only
  • 1827-1935Missouri, Births and Christenings, 1827-1935 at FamilySearch.org — Index only; incomplete; Coverage Table; does not index a specific set of records; may include information previously published in the IGI or Vital Records Index collections
  • 1851-1910Missouri Birth Records, 1851-1910 at Ancestry.com($) — Index only
  • Missouri Quaker Records at Ancestry.com($) — Index only; includes birth, marriages, and death in the index
  • 1 Jan 1910-PresentMissouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services.
  • 1920-2015Missouri, Birth Index, 1920-2015 at MyHeritage — Index, ($)

Marriages:

  • Pre-1850Missouri Marriages to 1850 at Ancestry.com($) — Index only; incomplete
  • 1750-1920Missouri, Marriages, 1750-1920 at FamilySearch.org — Index only; incomplete; Coverage Table; does not index a specific set of records; may include information previously published in the IGI or Vital Records Index collections
  • 1800-1991Missouri, County Marriage, Naturalization, and Court Records, 1800-1991 — index and images
  • 1766-1983Missouri Marriages, 1766-1983 at Ancestry.com($) — Index only; incomplete
  • 1776-1988United States Marriages – Missouri, 1776-1988($) index and images
  • 1851-1900Missouri Marriages, 1851-1900 at Ancestry.com($) — Index only; incomplete; includes 29 Missouri counties
  • 1881-present Recorder of Deeds, or County Clerk, or local church where the marriage or divorce took place. NOTE: the Circuit Court usually held divorce records, except St. Louis city records are in Kansas City circuit court.
  • Missouri Quaker Records at Ancestry.com($) — Index only; includes birth, marriages, and death in the index
  • 1 Jul 1948—Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services (marriage and divorce records).

Deaths:

  • Pre-1910Death Records Database, Pre-1910 at Missouri State Archives — Index only
  • 1850-1910 County Clerk or Recorder of Deeds in the county where the death occured. NOTE: death records may be located in St. Louis County even if they did not live there!
  • 1822-1994Missouri, Newspaper Death Index, 1822-1994 at Ancestry.com($) — Index only; incomplete; deaths taken from 3 Missouri newspapers: Callaway, Montgomery, and Cole Counties.
  • 1834-1910Missouri, Death Records, 1834-1910 at Ancestry.com($) — Index and images; info from Missouri State Archives
  • 1910-1969Missouri Death Certificate Database, 1910-1969 at Missouri State Archives — Index and images.
  • 1867-1976Missouri, Deaths and Burials, 1867-1976 at FamilySearch.org — Index only; incomplete; does not index a specific set of records; may include information previously published in the IGI or Vital Records Index collections
  • 1968-2015Missouri, Death Index, 1968-2015 at MyHeritage - index ($)
  • 1873-1976Missouri, Deaths and Burials Index, 1873-1976 at Ancestry.com($) — Index only
  • 1883-1930Missouri Deaths, 1883-1930 at FamilySearch — index and images
  • Coroner's Inquest Database at Missouri State Archives — Index only; incomplete, covers 10 counties
  • Missouri Quaker Records at Ancestry.com($) — Index only; includes birth, marriages, and death in the index
  • 1 Jan 1910-PresentMissouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services

Ordering information for Birth, Marriage, Death Certificates:

Additional Websites to other Missouri Databases:

Birth Records[edit | edit source]

Online databases for Missouri Birth Records

County and City Records of Births and Deaths[edit | edit source]

Statewide registration of births and deaths began in 1863, but registration was not compulsory. Missouri has required registration in each county only during the years 1883 to 1893 and since 1909. The state did not achieve 90 percent registration of births until 1927 and of deaths until 1911.

Write to the appropriate county clerk for records before 1910. Those from 1883 to 1893 are also available from the Missouri State Archives.

The Family History Library has copies of most of the existing civil vital records in Missouri from about 1883 to the early 1900s. For example, records of Jefferson County births, stillbirths, and deaths from 1883 to 1892 are available.

State Records of Births and Deaths[edit | edit source]

Online databases for Missouri Birth Records

Although the files are not open for public inspection, you can obtain copies of the state's births and deaths registered after 1 January 1910 by writing to:

Bureau of Vital Records
P.O. Box 570
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570
Telephone: 314-761-6387 (births)
Telephone: 314-751-6376 (deaths)
Internet: Department of Health and Senior Services Bureau of Vital Records. maintains Missouri birth, death, marriage and divorce records.

The current fees for obtaining copies of the state's records are available at the website of the CDC (Center for Disease Control).  Click here.

Marriage Records[edit | edit source]

Online databases for Missouri Birth Records

Marriage records have been kept by Missouri county clerks from the earliest days of each county. Some records date from the early 1800s when the area was a territory without counties. Statewide registration of marriage began in 1881, and the files are mostly complete after that date. You can obtain copies of these documents from the various county clerks.

The Family History Library has copies of marriage records from each county. These often date to the 1920s. Most pre-1850 marriages in Missouri have been transcribed in publications such as the following:

Transcriptions Online

Book only

The Bureau of Vital Records (see address above) has an index to marriage records from July 1948 to the present.

Gretna Greens[edit | edit source]

Death Records[edit | edit source]

Online databases for Missouri Death Records

Missouri State Archives has created the Missouri Digital Heritage Website providing access to death certificates from 1910-1960. Death certificates contain valuable information for family historians and researchers. The Missouri Death Certificate Database, containing death records created after 1910 and over 50 years old, makes that information available online through a searchable index that links to a digitized image of the original death certificate.

The index can be searched by first name and last name, county, and by year and month. Once a name is selected, a digitized image of the original certificate can be retrieved.

This is an ongoing project and additional records will be added as they are transcribed and imaged. If the image of the certificate is not yet available researchers can request a photocopy of the certificate by contacting the Archives Reference Desk . For death certificates less than 50 years old please contact the Missouri Bureau of Vital Records.

Missouri Coroner's Inquest is an abstract of records that have been indexed and are available for online research. The original records are available on microfilm at the Missouri State Archives. The database contains records from various counties, the City of St. Louis, and the St. Louis Medical Examiner.dditional records will be added as they reach seventy-two years of age.

Information Contained:
Case number
Name of deceased
Age or date of birth
Race
Gender
Date of death
Cause of death
Location of death

St Louis Missouri Police Officers' Deaths, 1861-1899 These deaths are taken from, St. Louis Board of Commissioner’ Record of Resignations, Reductions, Promotions, and Deaths 1861-1899. The names are listed alphabetically.
Information Given:
Name
Death Date
Cause of Death
Notes

Cause of Death[edit | edit source]

  • Causes of Death - use this resource when trying to interpret a disease or medical condition listed on a death record or certificate

Divorce Records[edit | edit source]

Divorce proceedings have been filed with a court of common pleas, a circuit court, or the state legislature. Most divorce records can be obtained by contacting the appropriate circuit court clerk in the county where the plaintiff resided. The Family History Library has some of these court records, which include divorce information. The Bureau of Vital Records has divorce records from 1948 to the present.

  • To access any possible divorce records available through the Family History Library, use the Place-names Search in the FamilySearch Catalog for:
MISSOURI,[COUNTY] - COURT RECORDS
MISSOURI,[COUNTY] - VITAL RECORDS
  • A published list of early divorce records is Lois Stanley, Divorces and Separations in Missouri, 1808-1853. FHL Book 977.8 P2sd
    This volume includes notices from newspapers.

Additional Helps[edit | edit source]

Tips[edit | edit source]

  • Information listed on vital records is given by an informant.  Learn the relationship of the informant to the subject(s) of the record.  The closer the relationship of the informant to the subject(s) and whether or not the informant was present at the time of the event can help determine the accuracy of the information found on the record.
  • If you are unable to locate vital records recorded by governments, search for church records of christening, marriage, death or burial.  A family Bible may have been used to record births, marriages and deaths.
  • Records for African Americans may be recorded in separate files with separate indexes.
  • Privacy laws may restrict your access to some vital records.  Copies of some vital records recorded in the last 100 years may be uanavailable to anyone except a direct relative.
  • Search for Vital Records in the FamilySearch Catalog by using a Place Search and then choosing Vital Records.  Search for Missouri to locate records filed by the State and then search the name of the county to locate records kept by the county.

Substitute Records[edit | edit source]

These links will take you to wiki pages describing alternate sources for birth, marriage and death records.

  • Church Records: Depending on the denomination, church records may contain information about birth, marriage and death.
  • Cemetery Records: Cemetery records are a rich source of birth and death information.  These records may also reveal family relationships.
  • Census Records: Census records are a valuable source for birth and marriage information. You may also determine approximate time of death when the individual disappear from the census. This is a good place to begin a search.
  • Newspapers: Besides obituaries, local newspapers may contain birth and marriage announcements and death notices.  Also check newspaper social columns for additional information. 
  • Obituaries: Obituaries found in newspapers can list the age of the deceased, birth date and place, death date and place, and names of living relatives and their residences.
  • Periodicals: Local genealogical and historical societies often publish periodicals which may contain abstracted early birth, marriage and death information.
  • Military Records:  Military pension records can give birth, marriage and death information,  In addtion, soldiers' homes records can included this same information.
  • Probate Records: If no death record exists, probate records may be helpful in estimating when an individual has died. Probate records in the 20th Century often contain the exact death date.
  • History:  Local histories, family histories and biographies can all be sources of birth, marriage and death information. Often this information is found in county-level records or in surname searches of the FamilySearch Catalog.

Lost or Missing Records[edit | edit source]

Barry 1872, Barton 1860, Bates 1861, Bollinger 1866, 1884, Caldwell 1860, 1896, Camden 1902,Cape Girardeau 1870, Chariton 1864, 1973 Christian 1865, Crawford 1873, 1884, Dade 1863, Dallas 1863, 1864, 18867, DeKalb 1864, 1878 Dent 1864, Douglas 1886, Dunklin 1872, Gentry 1885, Greene 1861, Harrison 1874, Hickory 1852, 1881, Holt 1965, Howard 1887, Howell 1866, Jasper 1863, 1883,  McDonald 1863, Maries 1868, Mercer 1898, Montgomery 1864,1901, Morgan 1887, Newton 1862, Oregon during C.W., Osage 1880, Pemiscot 1883, Pike 1864,  Pulaski 1903, Randolph 1880, Reynolds 1872, Saline 1864, Shannon 1863, 1871, 1938, 1893, Stoddard 1864, Taney 1885, Texas 1932, Vernon C.W., Wayne 1854, 1892, Webster 1863, 1881, Wright 1864, 1897

Research Guides[edit | edit source]

To learn more about the history and availability of vital records, see Guide to Public Vital Statistics Records in Missouri. [4]

A wiki article describing an online collection is found at:

Missouri Deaths and Burials - FamilySearch Historical Records

More Online Links[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. ↑Ormesher, Susan. Missouri Marriages Before 1840. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1982. Family History Library book 977.8 V2o; fiche 6051425.
  2. ↑Brooks, Linda Barber. Missouri Marriages to 1850. Three Volumes. St. Louis,Missouri: Ingmire Pub., 1983-. Family History Library book 977.8 V2bm.
  3. ↑Arlene H. Eakle, "Have you searched and searched for a marriage without finding it?" in Genealogy Blog at http://www.arleneeakle.com/wordpress/2007/02/19/have-you-searched-and-searched-for-the-marriage-without-finding-it/ (accessed 8 January 2011).
  4. ↑(St. Louis, Missouri: Historical Records Survey, 1941; Family History Library book 977.8 V23g; film 928021 item 10.
Sours: https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Missouri_Vital_Records

And death records mo birth

Birth & Death Certificates

General Information

Certified copies of Missouri birth and death certificates are provided at the following locations:

Vital Records in the Harold K. Bengsch Building
227 East Chestnut Expressway
Monday-Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm

To find out how to request a birth or death certificate, please see the information below. For additional questions related to vital records including birth and death certificates, please call (417) 864-1411.

Birth Certificates

The Vital Records Office can provide certified copies of Missouri birth certificates for $15.00 each with a cash, check, credit card (authorized signature required), or money order payment. Birth certificates are available for most births of 1920 to present. The birth certificate copy will be printed while you wait.

Birth certificates can also be requested through the mail by submitting the birth certificate applicationwith a check or money order (please do not send cash through the mail) to:

Vital Records
Springfield-Greene County Health Department
227 East Chestnut Expressway
Springfield, MO 65802

In the State of Missouri, vital records are not open to the general public and can only be obtained by:
  • Person listed on certificate
  • Parent if listed on certificate
  • Grandparent if listed on certificate
  • Siblings
  • Uncle or Aunt if relative is listed as parent on certificate
  • Step-parent if marriage certificate is shown
  • Legal guardian accompanied by guardianship papers

Please provide the individual's full name and date of birth, as well as the mother's full maiden name. You will be required to show identification

  • Government issued photo identification
  • Driver's License
  • Passport or Visa
  • Military ID
  • Booking Sheet

If you don't have a government issued photo ID, you must bring any TWO of the following documents:

Death Certificates

Certified copies of Missouri death certificates will also be provided to qualified individuals for $14.00 for the first copy and $11.00 for each subsequent copy for the same person in the same visit. Death Certificate Application

Death certificates may be issued to relatives or to third parties with a legal need. Please provide the deceased person's full name and date of death.

Death certificates are available for deaths occurring from 1980 to the present. For certified copies of death certificates for deaths occurring before 1980, send a written request to:

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Bureau of Vital Records
P.O. Box 570
Jefferson City, MO 65102

Certificates for births, deaths, marriages and divorces that took place outside the state of Missouri can be obtained by visiting the National Center for Health Statisticswebsite. Fees and delivery times may vary by state and by document.

Death Certificate Application for Funeral Homes Only

Online Orders

This office does not accept online orders. However, for your convenience, documents can be requested by phone or online through an independent company that we have partnered with to provide this service -- VitalChek Network, Inc.An additional $9.50 fee is charged by VitalChek for using this service, and all major credit cards are accepted, including American Express®, Discover®, MasterCard® or Visa®. To further expedite the request, overnight services are offered. Applications can be placed on-line at www.vitalchek.comor by phone, toll-free at 1-877-817-7363.

Additional Information

For births or deaths that occurred outside Missouri, see Where to Write for Vital Records, CDC. See also the State of Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Information on Birth, Death, Marriage and Divorce Information.
Sours: https://www.springfieldmo.gov/2890/Birth-Death-Certificates
AF-524: Death Certificates: A Closer Look at Death Records #1 - Ancestral Findings Podcast

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