Sand exterior paint

Sand exterior paint DEFAULT

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Painting an exterior in the summer

As a morning runner I spend a lot of time looking at houses and exterior paint and there is a home on my route that has had ladders outside for the last year. The owner is an acquaintance whom I know through my kids’ sports. When he began the project a year ago he had mentioned in passing that he was painting the exterior. Well, it appears that he has been scraping paint for 6 of the last 12 months. It doesn’t look like the house has any rotted wood that needs to be replaced or any structural issues, but it makes me wonder – how much paint is he going to scrape? How much paint do you need to scrape before you can begin priming and painting?

I took the question to my local Hirshfield’s manager, Grant Richards, and he gave me the following guidelines for prepping (and scraping!) exteriors:

  • How much scraping is enough? As a standard rule of thumb, when there isn’t any more flaking you’re in good shape. Remember, your paint is going to bond to the surface and if that surface is loose and flaky, then the new paint has nothing to cling to. Be sure that the surface is clear of loose paint chips and debris to get the best adhesion.
  • Do I need to sand after scraping? If you’ve done a good job of scraping away loose chips, most people will not be able to detect the edges of pre-existing paint on the surfaces. Certainly, various wood has unique qualities, but overall, you should not need to sand your exterior prior to painting. Another alternative to endless scraping is a product Grant recommends called “Peel Bond” by XIM. It’s an adhesive that goes on clear and bridges over the edges and essentially glues down the edge of pre-existing paint.
  • Do I have to apply a primer? If so, what kind? In the old days, this was a given. However, there are a number of new paints out there that are actually self-priming. Try products like Hirshfield’s Platinum exterior or Benjamin Moore’s Aura exterior. Both are self-priming and with a couple of coats you’ll be in good shape.
  • How late in the year can I paint my exterior? Grant tells me painters work on exteriors into early November. That said, we’re talking about weather in the upper Midwest, so you need to consider two things: Temperature and dew point. If temperatures are in the upper 30’s or 40 degree range it’s possible to paint exteriors, but to be safe, check with local painting professionals for their advice.

 

 

Sours: https://www.hirshfields.com/how-much-scraping-and-sanding-is-really-necessary/

Prepare exterior surfaces

Masking the area

Masking before you paint makes the job faster and cleaner.

  1. Use a good quality masking tape along any edges you don’t want to paint, including trims or windows.
  2. Push the edges of the tape down firmly to ensure straight edges.
  3. Remove the masking tape at a 45° angle before the paint dries completely. If the paint is too dry, the masking tape can rip the paint film when it is removed.
  4. If the paint dries before the tape is removed, using a sharp blade, score the edge of the tape before removing so that it doesn’t pull paint away from the wall.

Undercoats and priming

If you are covering a dark colour or a surface that’s never been primed or painted, you will need to use an undercoat. It can also provide a better coverage and hiding power than just applying extra top coats.

To apply an undercoat simply paint one coat of Dulux 1Step Prep Water Based Primer, Sealer & Undercoat after preparing the area. If your topcoat is oil based use Dulux1Step Oil Based Primer, Sealer & Undercoat instead.

If your substrate is particularly powdery thoroughly wash the surface with Selleys Original Sugar Soap and seal with Dulux PRECISION Sealer Binder .

For metal substrates use Dulux Precision All Metal Primer to provide additional corrosion protection.

Sours: https://www.dulux.com.au/how-to/preparation-and-painting-guides/exterior/exterior-paint-preparation
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Painting - How to Prepare a House for Exterior Painting

Sanding exterior window trim prior to painting

Surface prep of a house’s exterior is vital both for health and safety reasons. It can also make the new paint job look good and last. Here are the basic exterior painting preparation steps to follow to provide the best finish for your prized clients.

1

Remove Contaminants

Although lead paint has been outlawed since 1978, many homes still have lead paint on their walls. If you suspect lead, don't try to scrape or sand it off, and don't do any washing. A contractor who's certified to handle lead abatement must handle the removal of the paint before you get started. Test the paint before you proceed with any further exterior painting prep.

A common contaminant, especially in humid areas, is mold or mildew. Look for black, green or brown stains that may have a fuzzy appearance. If you're not sure whether a given stain is mold or mildew or just dirt, apply common bleach to it. If it bleaches away, you've just killed some mold or mildew.

Use bleach or another EPA-registered microbiocide or fungicide to remove mold and mildew. While bleach alone can work in a 3:1 solution mixed with water, there are more effective, highly concentrated products available. Look for cleaners and degreasers that do double duty, removing not only mold and mildew but also grime, grease and oil.

If you're painting a house in a region where mold and mildew are likely to be continuing problems, add a mildewcide to the paint to prevent your paint job from developing future contaminant problems.

2

Wash the Home

Help the new paint adhere by getting the exterior surfaces of the house as clean as possible before you paint. If the house has existing paint, you can speed up this part of the process by power washing the entire house. Pressure washing is also an option for walls that are stained, although you may want to use gentler options depending on the condition of the wood.

If the house has soft wood siding, avoid power washing as it can damage the wood. Soft woods such as redwood or cedar, especially if they're older and weathered, need to be cleaned by hand-scrubbing with detergent and water.

It's easy to spray down a home's exterior and think that it's clean enough, but if you choose this route, you are likely to regret it later, as the paint may not stick to the older surface. Every minute you spend cleaning the house properly is an investment in a great paint job and a satisfied client at the end of the day.

3

Make Any Needed Repairs and Remove Peeling Paint

Look over the house closely for damage and peeling paint. You may have to fill holes, caulk surfaces and get rid of loose paint. Be meticulous about removing poorly adhering paint, scraping it away by hand. Another option is to use a stiff metal wire brush to scrape it away or use a power sander with a paint-stripping attachment. Work with the grain of the wood as you scrape. When you're working on wood shakes, be aware that bits of the steel wire can become lodged in the soft wood. Remove all these pieces by hand. If you don't, they can damage your paint job and cause later discoloration in the wood.  Be sure to wear a dust mask or even a respirator as well as work gloves and eye protection while working with peeling paint.

4

Sand the Exterior Walls

Sanding the exterior walls is necessary to provide a real mechanical bond between the coats of paint. If you don't rough up the surfaces sufficiently, your paint job may look good when you walk away from it, but in just a few years, the paint starts to show all sorts of errors. Especially if you're working with oil-based paint, you may be tempted to just start painting, since oil paint wets the previous coat so well that it sticks well initially and looks great. However, for a finish that will ensure happy, repeat customers, do the sanding work to create a paint job that lasts.

Refresh the surfaces of weathered wood with medium-grit paper. For areas where you're going to use glossy or semigloss paint, such as door and window trim, opt for another pass of sanding with fine-grit paper. Sanding is a crucial step for any paint job, so be sure to pass over all the existing paint thoroughly to create a rough surface that's ready to receive the new paint.

5

Prime the Walls

Priming also helps new paint stick to previously painted surfaces. You need to prime any areas where old paint has already been peeled off, but to create a cohesive paint job that looks good all over, prime the entire house. Priming is especially crucial if you're using a latex paint to paint over a surface that already contains an oil-based paint. Use either an exterior latex primer or an oil-based primer recommended for exterior repainted surfaces, choosing your primer depending on the paint choice.

Choose a light-colored primer or one that supports the paint color you're going to be using. If you're changing the color the house significantly, priming becomes even more important. Once you've primed, don't leave any primed surface unpainted.

 

Once you're finished priming, you're ready to begin painting. Get your equipment ready, and start the paint job when you have an assurance of good weather. Remember that every hour you spend on prep pays off later with an excellent paint job that pleases your clients and lasts for many years.

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Sours: https://www.nortonabrasives.com/en-us/resources/expertise/painting-how-prepare-house-exterior-painting
Exterior granule stone texture design on highlighting box walls in house

A fresh paint job has the power to totally transform the look of your house in less time and for less cash than any other remodeling project.

That thin skin of resin and pigment also protects your investment, shielding it from sun, wind, and rain—until the paint begins to crack and peel, that is. Then it's time to button up with a couple of new coats.

How Long Does Exterior Paint Last For?

Properly applied, new paint should last for a good 15 years, provided you use top-quality materials, apply them with care (and with an eye on the weather), and, most important, clean and sand every surface first.

How to Paint Your House

Is it time for a fresh coat? Here's what you need to know to get a first-class finish on your home's exterior.

Wash

Photo by Sarah Wilson

A thorough scrubbing is a must before painting any exterior surface. It removes the dirt and broken-down paint residues that keep fresh coats from adhering and gets rid of mildew that grows on paint in all but the most arid climates. Most contractors clean with pressure washers, but in the hands of someone unfamiliar with the equipment, these can gouge wood, shatter glass, and drive water behind siding and trim. Using a hose, a pump sprayer, and a scrub brush is slower but safer, and just as effective.

Before the scrubdown, protect nearby plants by misting their leaves and saturating the surrounding soil with water, pulling them away from the house, and shrouding them in fabric drop cloths. (Plants will cook under plastic.) Lay more drop cloths along the base of the walls to collect any falling paint debris.

Walls should be wet down before getting scrubbed, then washed with a gallon of water mixed with 1 cup chlorine bleach and 1 cup of either a concentrated, phosphate-free cleaner, such as a trisodium phosphate (TSP) substitute, or Jomax House Cleaner. Working in sections, from the bottom to the top, will avoid streaks. Be sure to rinse walls well before the solution dries. Wood siding and trim should be ready to paint after a day or two of dry weather.

Scrape, Part I

Photo by Sarah Wilson

Paint that has peeled, bubbled, or blistered has got to go. But if lead is present—a strong possibility in houses built before 1978—you need to proceed with extra care. To lay any doubts to rest, you can send paint chip samples to a lab, such as Macs Lab's Home Free; for about $38, they'll give you a definitive answer.

If your paint does contain lead, you'll need to take special precautions during the scraping and sanding phases to protect yourself, your family, and the environment from toxic dust. If the paint is lead-free, you need only don a dust mask and lay down tarps to catch debris before tackling the most crucial part of the project.

New Orleans contractor Joseph Wallis did use a PaintShaver on this project to capture lead dust. This carbide-tipped angle grinder, which has a dust-collecting shroud that connects to a HEPA-filter vac, can be rented by mail from the manufacturer for about $50 a day.

Scrape, Part II

Photo by Sarah Wilson

Scraping paint by hand is a grueling task because you've got to attack it from every direction. But compared to power grinders and sanders, it's the least damaging way to remove the old layers. You can speed up the process by using a heating gun to soften the paint (as shown).

Safety First: Use a respirator when scraping paint by hand. Also, make sure you protect the surrounding work area—including any plants and shrubs—with a tarp covering.

Sand, Part I

Photo by Sarah Wilson

With loose paint removed, it's time to step back and assess what remains. If most of the paint still adheres well and it's not too bumpy, the boundary between the paint and the bare wood can be smoothed with 50- or 80-grit sandpaper.

Sand, Part II

Photo by Sarah Wilson

Small random-orbit or pad sanders make this job go faster. (Wallis first covers these boundaries with Synkoloid patching compound so no edge is visible after sanding.) As shown, you want to make sure that there is a feathered, smooth transition from exposed wood to old paint. For areas that might get close scrutiny, you can follow up with a 100- or 120-grit rubdown to erase any scratches.

If less than half the old paint is left, however, it may be worth stripping it all off. Guertin gets rid of stubborn remnants using shrouded grinders (like the PaintShaver), infrared paint strippers (such as the Speedheater), or chemical strippers (like Multi-Strip), then smooths the wood with a course or two of sanding. When siding (or bank accounts) can't take the shock of a total strip job, Rich O'Neil, of Masterwork Painting in Bedford, Massachusetts, has successfully hidden rough, well-adhered paint under Peel Bond, a thick primer.

Safety First: When using a random-orbit sander, be sure to protect yourself from refuse with a respirator. For sanding by hand, a dust mask will do.

Patch and Fill

Photo by Sarah Wilson

After the sanding is done, it's time to fill minor cracks and dents, repair any rot, and replace any pieces that are too far gone. (Wholesale replacement of wood siding or trim will likely require a carpenter.)

O'Neil patches shallow holes and divots with Ready Patch because it dries fast, sands smooth, and stays flexible. Deep cracks and rotten spots are best repaired with two-step epoxies, such as those made by Advanced Repair Technology. (For a step-by-step instructions, see Repairing Rot with Epoxy.) The days of using polyester auto-body fillers on wood are over. "They cure too hard," says Portland, Oregon–based painting contractor Kathleen George. "They look good at first, but then they peel away."

Hold off on caulking the cracks until everything has been primed. "Primer protects the wood when—not if—the caulk fails," says O'Neil.

Prime, Part I

Photo by Sarah Wilson

Primers are formulated to penetrate, seal, and provide a good surface for the top coats to stick to. Use them over bare wood, Spackle, and epoxy, or over paint with a chalky, deteriorated surface. (If the paint surface is clean and sound, you can skip the priming step.)

Acrylic primers can be used on most surfaces, but on cedar or redwood, oil-based coatings are a must because they lock in these woods' reddish-brown "extractives," which will leach out and leave behind rusty stains if the wood is primed with a water-based product.

Painters often tint primer close to the color of the top coat, but Wallis thinks that's a recipe for "holidays," or missed spots. Instead, he tints his primer a contrasting color. "If I can see the color coming through, I know I need to apply more paint," he says. On the cottage shown in this story, he chose a gray-blue primer to go under a peach top coat.

If primer is sprayed on, "back-brushing" it immediately by hand will work the coating into every crack and crevice.

Prime, Part II

Photo by Sarah Wilson

Tip: Spray exposed nailheads with a metal primer to prevent rust from bleeding through the paint.

Caulk

Photo by Sarah Wilson

When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk."

Paint, Part I

Photo by Sarah Wilson

Deciding which paint to use has gotten much easier now that acrylic latexes have pushed oil-based paints almost to extinction. The acrylics offer superior performance (they don't harden with age, the way oils do, so they move and breathe without blistering), they don't mildew as readily, and they emit fewer VOCs, so they comply with new air-quality regulations. They also work over both oil- and water-based primers.

Oil paint still has a place in high-traffic areas such as wood steps and porch floors because of its superior wear resistance, and on steel and cast-iron railings, which benefit from oil's water repellency.

Paint, Part II

Photo by Sarah Wilson

The last big decision is how to apply the paint. Most pros use paint sprayers because they're fast, but in inexperienced hands a high-powered sprayer can leave drips, thin coats, and a mist that may land on many things other than your siding.

If you do hire a painter who uses a sprayer, make sure he is meticulous about removing, covering, or masking off everything in the area that might get hit with overspray: gutters, roofs, windows, shrubbery, walkways, cars—you name it.

Once you choose a paint brand, the pros advise against additives, such as mildewcides. But they will add conditioners such as Floetrol (for latex) or Penetrol (for oils) to slow drying times in hot weather so brush and lap marks don't show, and to make paint more sprayable.

Paint, Part III

Photo by Sarah Wilson

Every painting job develops a unique choreography as ladders go up and come down and tarps are unrolled and folded up. But two basic principles remain:

  1. Start at the top and work down.
  2. Work in the shade, out of the sun's glare.

As the dance proceeds, keep an eye on the weather. Rain can wash freshly applied latex right off the wall, and a temperature dip below 50 degrees F two days after application can interfere with adhesion and curing and dull the sheen of glossy paints. (Latexes like Sherwin-Williams's Duration and Benjamin Moore's MoorGard Low Lustre are formulated to tolerate temps as low as 35 and 40 degrees, respectively.)

What Do I Need to Paint My House?

Do-it-yourselfers are best off using a brush for maximum control. You may end up with a better quality job, to boot. Says Kathleen George, "With a brush, I know that I've inspected every square inch of a house." Mini rollers speed application on clapboards and trim but should be followed immediately with a brush.

Whichever application method you end up using, the pros are universal in their insistence that two top coats are always better than one. Says O'Neil, "It's one of the real secrets of a long-lasting paint job."

Sours: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/painting/21018466/how-to-paint-your-home-s-exterior

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