Walden university history

Walden university history DEFAULT

Walden University

Nashville, Tennessee

1865-1926

E-Travel

Catalogs for Central Tennessee College are available from both Internet Archive and Ancestry.com.  Jay Stovall profiles the school in Methodist Adventures in Higher Education as does An Era of Progress and Promise.  The Nashville Globe as well as other Black newspapers such as the Colored American from Washington DC and Broad Axe from Chicago covered some school activities. Georgia Patton (right) was one of the first female graduates of Meharry Medical College in 1893.

History

Nashville Globe states, "Walden University was the first institution organized for the education of colored people in the South."  It was formed in 1865 by the Methodist Episcopal Church as a community school for freed children and adults.  In 1867 it became known as Central Tennessee College to provide teacher education and training in science, agriculture and theology.  It added a preparatory department for those without the background for college.  In 1876 it added Meharry Medical College, one of the first in the South for Blacks.  Advertisements in the Globe in 1907 boasted of thirteen departments, including law, industrial arts, domestic science, commercial, music, and Braden Bible Training.  The Meharry Medical College also offered dentistry, pharmacy and nurse training.  In 1898 Central Tennessee College became Walden University, named for Bishop John Morgan Walden.

 

The 1884 catalog shows a student body of 360—10 collegiate, 35 preparatory, 2 academic, 235 normal, 46 Common English, 2 law, 31 medical, 31 music, and 31 theological.  An additional 115 preparatory students attended the affiliated West Tennessee Academy at Mason, TN.

 

Student organizations with religious orientation included the YMCA, the Haven Missionary Society, the William Taylor Friends of Africa, the College Hill Temperance Society and the Young Women's Christian Temperance Union.  Literary organizations included the Excelsior Literary Society, the Library Congress, the Frances Harper Literary Society and the Lyceneum.

 

Bobby Lovett notes that a demographic shift in black population in Nashville at the end of the century led to the creation of the state-supported Tennessee Normal and Industrial College.  In 1915 Meharry Medical College obtained a separate charter, separating itself from Walden University. So by 1922 the renamed Walden College was reduced to a small two-year school.   Walden College last advertised in December of 1926.

 

Bricks and Mortar

Classes began in the Andrew Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church.  Then after  occupying the old confederate gun factory, the school purchased property on Maple Street in 1868.  The 1884 catalog lists “five substantial brick edifices.” The medical school was located at the corner of Maple and Chestnut.   Rust Hall, the four-story administration building, housed students on its upper two floors.  When the building burned in 1903, twelve female students were killed and fourteen injured leaping from the building, which had no fire escape. 

 

In 1922  the college moved to a new location closer to the part of town occupied by Blacks.   After Walden closed, That campus sat empty until 1935, when it was leased and then purchased by Trevecca Nazarene College.

 

The high water mark of football was the 1902 season, which drew a special article in Colored American.  The article notes that all the Walden players were from Meharry Medical College.   The article points out that the team's only loss was to Fisk.  Even though Walden won the game 11-5, the "incompetent referee caused the game to be broken up in a squabble and awarded it to Fisk."  The team looked forward to a game with Shaw, the North Carolina champion.

 

An article in Broad Axe showed the 1925 schedule, in which Walden College posted a 6-1-1 record, losing only to Roger Williams.

 

Sports

College Football Data Warehouse shows a dozen football games for Walden from 1902 until1924. Opponents were generally local--Fisk, Roger Williams, Tennessee A&I, Nashville Athletic Club, and Pearl High School.

Note: Images are used in accordance with their “terms of use” as I understand those terms.  Recopying or republishing these images may be restricted or forbidden.

Sours: https://www.lostcolleges.com/walden-university

Walden University began as a school for freedmen under the sponsorship of northern Methodist Episcopal Church missionaries. In late 1865, the Reverend A.A. Gee and others began classes for freedmen in Andrew Chapel M. E. Church (now Clark Memorial M. E. Church), moving in 1866 to the old Confederate gun factory on College Street (now Third Avenue, South). After the Nashville public schools opened in September of 1867, the school was chartered as Central Tennessee College, under the Reverend W. B. Crichlow. The school's board of trustees attempted to purchase land on Rutledge Hill, but white residents obtained a court order to block the sale. In 1868, Central Tennessee College purchased the Nance property on Maple Street (now First Avenue, South), where the Bureau of Freedmen, Refugees and Abandoned Lands helped to finance the construction of two brick buildings.
        Central Tennessee College operated from 1870 to 1900 under John Braden, a Union army chaplain. By 1874, the school's 240 pupils studied grammar and secondary and normal (classical and teacher training) subjects. During Braden's presidency, the school began to issue college degrees.
        In 1876, the Meharry Medical Department was added to Central Tennessee College. The head of the department was Dr. George Whipple Hubbard (1841-1921, a teacher for the Pittsburgh Freedmen's Aid Commission and former principal of Nashville's first Negro public school, Bellview.
        During the 1880s, Central Tennessee College grew rapidly and added several new departments: law (1877-l882), industrial art (1885), dentistry (1886), and pharmacy (1889). In the IX90s, the school expanded its female and industrial education opportunities, adding a nursing department in 1892. Young female students also could learn domestic science in such courses as sewing, cooking, and home economics. Around 1895, the students attempted to stage a rebellion while demanding more black faculty members, but they quieted down because of respect for "old man Braden" and his life-long devotion to freedmen's education.
        In 1900, the name of the school was changed to Walden University, in honor of Bishop John Morgan Walden, formerly a freedmen's missionary. Then the school had thirteen departments, a faculty of sixty-eight, and 1,360 alumnae. Thereafter, the suitability and success of Walden declined. In 1911, for example, the school graduated only one law student. Walden University found it increasingly difficult to attract grammar and high school students after the Tennessee Agricultural, Industrial, and Normal State School was opened in Nashville in 1912.
        Alumnus Edward A. White became the first black president of Walden University in 1915, which was a year of financial hardship resulting from the depression of 1914-1915. Also in 1915, the Meharry faculty decided to form a separate college. Hubbard secured the charter for Meharry Medical College and remained its president until his death. Meharry retained the old campus.
        In 1922, Walden University was renamed Walden College and moved to a twelve-acre campus on the eastern hills overlooking the black neighborhood of Trimble Bottom. The new campus was formerly the site of Stevens Infirmary in 1864. The site was used intermittently by St. Mary's Orphanage from 1863 to 1903. It was a sanitarium from 1905 to 1920 and the home of Judge Chester K. Hart. Walden College operated there until 1925 as a junior college for teacher education, business, the arts, and pre-dental and premedical education. Financial difficulties forced the school to close. Walden College's campus was vacant until 1935, at which time Trevecca Nazarene College leased it, then purchased the campus in 1937.

Sours: https://ww2.tnstate.edu/library/digital/walden.htm
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Walden University was a historically black co-educational college in Nashville, Tennessee. It was founded in 1865 as a school for freedmen under the sponsorship of northern Methodist Episcopal Church missionaries. In late 1865, the Reverend A.A. Gee and others began classes for freedmen in Andrew Chapel M.E Church (now Clark Memorial M.E. Church). In 1866 the classes were moved to the old Confederate gun factory on College Street (now Third Avenue South). After the first Nashville public schools opened in September of 1867, the school was charted as Central Tennessee College, under the leadership of Reverend W.B. Crichlow. The school’s board of trustees attempted to purchase land on Rutledge Hill, but the white residents around the area obtained a court order to block the sale. In 1868 Central Tennessee College purchased property on Maple Street (now First Avenue South) where the Bureau of Freedom, Refugees and Abandoned Lands (Freedman’s Bureau) helped finance the construction of two brick buildings.

Central Tennessee College operated from 1870 to 1900 under John Braden, a union army chaplain. By 1874, the school’s two hundred and forty pupils studied grammar, secondary, and normal (classical and teacher training) subjects. The school began to issue college degrees during Braden’s presidency at the school. In 1876 Central Tennessee College added the Meharry Medical Department. The head of the department was Dr. George Whipple Hubbard, a teacher for the Pittsburgh Freedman’s Aid Commission and former principal of Nashville’s first African American public school, Bellview.

During the 1880s, Central Tennessee College grew rapidly and added several new departments: law (1877–1882), industrial art (1885), dentistry (1886), and pharmacy (1889). The institution expanded its female and industrial education opportunities, adding a nursing department in 1892. Young female students could learn domestic science in sewing, cooking, and home economics courses. In 1895 the students mounted a minor rebellion when they demanded more black faculty members, but they ended their protest out of respect to President Braden’s lifelong devotion to freedmen’s education.

In 1900 the name of the school was changed to Walden University, in honor of Bishop John Morgen Walden, formerly a freedmen’s missionary. The school by this point had thirteen departments, a faculty of sixty-eight, and one thousand three hundred and sixty graduates. Few years later, the university began to decline as reflected by the single law school student who graduated in 1911. Walden University also found it difficult to attract students after the Tennessee Agricultural, Industrial, and Normal State School (now Tennessee State University) opened in Nashville in 1912. Alumnus Edward A. White became the first black president of Walden University in 1915 at a time of severe financial hardship for the institution. Partly because of the financial difficulties, the Meharry faculty later that year decided to form a separate college.

In 1922 Walden University changed its name to Walden College and moved to a twelve-acre campus on the eastern hills overlooking the black neighborhood of Trimble Bottom. The Meharry Medical School retained the old campus. Walden University operated in its new location until 1925 as a junior college for teacher education, business, the arts, and pre-dental and premedical education. Financial difficulties forced the school to close in 1925. The Walden College campus remained vacant until 1937 when Trevecca Nazarene University purchased it.

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Cite this article in APA format:

Momodu, S. (2016, November 14). Walden University (1865-1925). BlackPast.org. https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/walden-university-1865-1925/



Source of the author's information:

“Walden University,” Tennessee State University Archives,
http://library3.tnstate.edu/library/DIGITAL/digitizing.html; “Walden
University,” Internet Archive,
https://web.archive.org/web/20080724102626/http://www.tnstate.edu/library/digital/walden.htmlBobby
L. Lovett, Walden University (1868-1925) A Profile of African Americans
in Tennessee History
(Nashville: Tennessee State University, 1996).

Sours: https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/walden-university-1865-1925/
Walden’s 53rd Commencement Speaker, mama Dr. Edna Adam Ismail

History

Return to: Section 2. About Walden University  

“I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.”

—Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854)

“Evidence for the failure of higher education is all around us,” wrote Harold L. “Bud” Hodgkinson in a 1969 issue of the journal Soundings. “Many of our brightest students are telling us that higher education is insulating them from reality rather than assisting them to peel off its infinite layers.” Though more a critique of the academy than a blueprint for a new institution, “Walden U.: A Working Paper” helped inspire the university that bears the name made famous by Henry David Thoreau.

As Hodgkinson was writing about the need for change in higher education, two New York teachers, Bernie and Rita Turner, fresh from graduate work at the New School for Social Research, were becoming interested in effecting social change by developing a new kind of institution for higher education: one that focused on significant problems affecting society from the vantage point of the professional and one that permitted professionals the opportunity to continue working while earning a degree. Thus, Walden University was born.

Walden began by offering a Doctor of Education (EdD) degree focused on dissertation research for midcareer professionals who had postponed finishing their doctoral degrees. Conferring its first degree in 1971 and implementing a formal curriculum in 1977, Walden provided learner-centered programs to professionals in education, business, and government who pursued doctoral degrees in related disciplines, including health and human services. In 1982, Walden’s academic office moved from Bonita Springs, FL, to Minneapolis, MN, in an effort to gain accreditation in a region that nurtures innovative education. The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools granted Walden University full regional accreditation status in 1990.

After more than 20 years with the university, satisfied that it was well-established, the Turners decided it was time to move on. Don Ackerman, a partner in a venture capital firm in Florida, became the university’s owner and chairman of the board in 1992. It was at this time that today’s Walden began to emerge as an online university with curricula that emphasized a scholar-practitioner philosophy: applying theoretical and empirical knowledge to professional practice with the goal of improving organizations, educational institutions, and whole communities.

To further advance access to higher education, in 1995, Walden offered its first master’s degree, the Master of Science in Educational Change and Technology Innovation. The web-based PhD in Psychology program was introduced in 1997, and after a rigorous 2-year self-study process, the North Central Association reaccredited the university for 7 years in 1998.

In February 2002, following the transfer of majority interest in Walden University from Ackerman to Sylvan Ventures, the university began changing from a graduate institution to a comprehensive university, offering bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. In 2004, Ackerman sold his remaining interest in Walden to Laureate Education, Inc. (formerly Sylvan Learning Systems, Inc.).

In January 2005, Walden University merged with National Technological University, an online engineering graduate school also owned by Laureate Education, Inc., providing the university reach into another major profession in need of access to high-quality education. With this change in ownership, the university has made significant improvements in its infrastructure, its faculty, and its student services. Walden was reaccredited by the North Central Association for another 7 years in 2005. The university’s curriculum for the master’s program in nursing was accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education in 2006.

Each year, the university continues to expand its offerings, with new programs recently added in education, psychology, healthcare, public administration, and management. In 2008, Walden named its College of Education in honor of Richard W. Riley (the former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education) and launched teacher preparation and special education endorsement programs.

To support its mission to increase access to higher education for working adults, in 2008 Walden launched full bachelor’s programs in such areas as business administration, child development, and psychology. Walden also created a third online peer-reviewed journal: the Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences. Similar to Walden’s other two journals, the Journal of Social Change and the International Journal of Applied Management and Technology, this journal promotes research findings and encourages dialogue between scholars and practitioners.

In 2009, Walden’s MS in Mental Health Counseling received accreditation by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Walden also introduced additional technology to better address the needs of its students. Services include a fully digital library, a Career Services Center with practical online tools, Virtual Field Experiences™ (VFE®), and MobileLearn™, which enables students to download course content for use on mobile devices.

In 2010, Walden celebrated its 40th anniversary. The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) granted accreditation to Walden’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Completion Program and reaccredited the Master of Science in Nursing program for 10 more years. Also in that year, Walden awarded Nelson Mandela an honorary doctorate degree.

The PhD in Management, Master of Business Administration (MBA), and BS in Business Administration programs were accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) in 2011. That same year, President Bill Clinton addressed more than 4,700 graduates from 39 countries at Walden’s 46th Commencement Ceremony, saluting their commitment to higher education while urging them to turn good intentions into positive change.

In 2012, Cynthia G. Baum, PhD, was named the ninth president of Walden after serving as vice president of the College of Health Sciences and the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and, more recently, as executive vice president of Walden. The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership received accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which was considered a significant milestone in Walden’s more than 40-year history of educating educators. Continuing the commitment to high-quality education, the Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) program was accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

The year 2013 was significant for several reasons: The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) reaffirmed Walden University’s accreditation for 10 years, the maximum period of time granted. The next reaffirmation of accreditation is scheduled for 2022–2023. Walden also marked a milestone as it celebrated its 50th Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013, at the Minneapolis Convention Center, with more than 600 graduates and 2,800 guests. The newest alumni are part of a graduating class of nearly 6,000 students representing 50 U.S. states and 65 countries who have completed their bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, or education specialist degree programs at Walden during the past 6 months. Also, Walden University’s dedicated day of service to others—a tradition of carrying out its mission of positive social change—became Global Days of Service, a week-long international event.

Additionally, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, in its first year of eligibility, received professional accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), and the BS in Information Technology program was accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET.

In July 2014, Walden celebrated its 52nd Commencement with its largest graduating class in attendance. Dr. Condoleezza Rice, former secretary of state, addressed more than 1,100 graduates and 5,500 guests, faculty, administration, and staff. Rice received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa degree, from Walden. The newest alumni included the first graduates from the Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) program and were part of a graduating class of nearly 5,500 students representing all 50 U.S. states and more than 70 countries.

The PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision and MS in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling programs were accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). These programs joined the university’s already accredited MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling program, making Walden one of the few institutions that offers these CACREP-accredited counseling programs online.

2015 marked Walden’s 45th anniversary. Jonathan Kaplan became Walden’s president, and the university continued its trend of forward-thinking education by introducing Tempo Learning®, a self-paced, competency-based education experience. Walden’s first program to utilize this format is the MS in Early Childhood Studies.

In 2016, Walden University’s School of Social Work and Human Services was officially renamed the Barbara Solomon School of Social Work and Human Services to honor Dr. Barbara Solomon for her contributions as a social work professional and scholar throughout her 50-year career. Dr. Solomon’s research and work have focused on improving social and mental health care services for underrepresented populations. As a board member, she has been an integral advisor for Walden’s social work and human services programs.

This year, Walden University achieved another milestone when our Master of Social Work (MSW) program achieved accreditation by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)–making Walden the first fully online institution to offer a CSWE-accredited MSW program. Graduating from a CSWE-accredited program is required for licensure in most states and helps our MSW graduates advance in their field.

2016 was also a pivotal year for Walden’s undergraduate students. The College of Undergraduate Studies became the Center for General Education (CGE). This shift allows students to focus more intensely on their particular discipline while enabling our educators and administrators to develop exemplary general education courses.

Today, the university’s academic programs are organized under the following academic units: 

Walden University’s Academic Structure

The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership

  • Division of Higher Education, Adult Learning, Administration and Leadership

  • Division of Teaching, Learning, and Professional Licensure

College of Health Sciences

  • School of Health Sciences
  • School of Nursing

College of Management and Technology

  • School of Information Systems and Technology
  • School of Management

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • School of Counseling
  • School of Psychology
  • School of Public Policy and Administration
  • Barbara Solomon School of Social Work and Human Services

Walden’s academic offices are located in Minneapolis. The administrative offices are headquartered in Baltimore.

Sours: https://catalog.waldenu.edu/content.php?catoid=147&navoid=47256

University history walden

Walden University

U.S. university

This article is about the Minnesota-based university. For the defunct university in Tennessee, see Walden University (Tennessee). For the fictional Walden College, see Doonesbury.

Walden University is an online for-profit university headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It offers Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, Master of Business Administration, Master of Public Administration, Master of Public Health, Education Specialist, Doctor of Education, Doctor of Business Administration, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

Walden University is owned by Adtalem Global Education, which purchased the university in August 2021.

History[edit]

Walden was established in 1970 by two New York teachers, Bernie and Rita Turner, who created a program for working adults/teachers to pursue doctoral degrees. In the summer of 1971, the first classes took place in Naples, Florida, focusing primarily on school administrators. The initial classes allowed students to form dissertation topics with their faculty partners before returning to work at their respective schools while completing their dissertations. In 1972, Walden conferred its first degrees: 46 PhDs and 24 EdDs at its first commencement in Naples.

In 1979, the Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Board licensed Walden to grant PhDs and EdDs in the state and in 1982 the school moved its headquarters to Minneapolis. In 1990, the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools accredited the University.

Sylvan Learning Systems, Inc., purchased 41 percent of Walden University in 2001,[4] gaining a controlling interest in 2002.[5] In 2004, Sylvan Learning Systems became Laureate Education, Inc. Former US President Bill Clinton was an Honorary Chancellor of Laureate International Universities from 2010 to 2015.[6] President Clinton was the keynote speaker at Walden University's commencement on July 30, 2011. Jonathan Kaplan served as CEO from 2007 to 2018. Mr. Kaplan previously served three years as economic policy adviser to President Clinton.[7]

In 2013, Laureate Education Inc. and GSV Capital, IFC, Learn Capital and Yuri Milner provided $43M in funding to Coursera to expand online education.[8] In 2015, Ernesto Zedillo, former president of Mexico and director of the Yale University Center for the Study of Globalization, succeeded President Clinton as Laureate Education's Presidential Counselor.

In 2016, Looney and Yannelis (Brookings Institution) reported that Walden University student loan debt was the second highest in the US, with 120,275 students owing $9.8 billion. While the 5-year student default rate was low (7 percent), the percentage of balance repaid on the loans was 0 percent.[9]

According to The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, Walden University graduated the largest number of African American doctoral students from 2011 to 2015.[10] From 2013 to 2017, the number of doctorates "awarded to Blacks" from Walden University was 969, more than two and a half times the number conferred by Howard University, which awarded 344 doctorates during the same period.[11] Walden University awards the most doctorates to African Americans among 377 accredited U.S. institutions, according to the National Science Foundation's 2018 survey.[12] Walden is the top granter of healthcare administration master's degrees, Master of Science in Nursing degrees, and public health doctoral degrees in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics IPEDS database.[13]

In September 2020, Adtalem Global Education began the process of purchasing Walden University.[14] In August 2021, Adtalem Global Education Inc completed its acquisition of Walden University for $1.48 billion.

In July 2021, Paula R. Singer was appointed as the interim president of Walden University. Singer previously served as the Chair of the Board of Walden University. [15]

Institutional finances[edit]

Walden University receives more than 75% of its funds from the US government, including more than $750 million a year for graduate student loans, the largest amount for any US college.[16] Walden University has been under heightened cash monitoring from the US Department of Education since 2016.[17]

On April 8, 2016, the Minnesota Office of Higher Education (MOHE) notified Walden University that its renewal application to participate in the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (SARA) was rejected because Walden University did not have an institutional federal financial composite score computed by the US Department of Education (DOE). In the absence of an institution-level financial composite score calculated by DOE, MOHE viewed Walden's parent company Laureate's financial composite score, calculated based on its global operations, which does not exceed 1.5.[18]

Accreditation[edit]

Walden University is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.[19]

Accredited professional programs[edit]

  • Walden's Richard W. Riley School of Education and Leadership is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).[20]
  • Walden's PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision; MS in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling; MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling; MS in School Counseling; and MS in Addiction Counseling programs are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).[21][22]
  • Walden University's Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), and Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs are all accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), a national accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.
  • Walden University's BS in Business Administration, BS in Accounting, Master of Business Administration (MBA), MS in Accounting, Doctor of Business Administration (DBA), and PhD in Management programs are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).
  • Walden's MS in Project Management program is accredited by the PMI Global Accreditation Center (GAC) for Project Management Education Programs.
  • Walden's Bachelor of Social Work and Master of Social Work is Council of Social Workers Education (CSWE) accredited, an accreditation needed to get licensed as a social worker in most states.[23]
  • Walden's BS in Information Technology is one of only a few online programs accredited by ABET, the internationally recognized accreditor for college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and engineering technology.[24]
  • Walden's Master of Public Health and Doctor of Public Health are accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).[25]
  • Walden University is designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.[26]

Unaccredited professional programs[edit]

Academics[edit]

Walden University consists of five colleges:

  • Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership
  • College of Management and Technology
  • College of Health Sciences
  • College of Nursing
  • College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Alumni and faculty[edit]

According to College Navigator, Walden University has 204 full-time instructors and 2,821 part-time instructors.[28]

Student outcomes[edit]

Walden's 2016 three-year student loan cohort default rate (CDR) is 6.9%; the national average is 10.1% for all US institutions. A study by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) found that the average annual federal student loan amounts of Walden graduate degree borrowers is similar to the federal loan amounts of students at public and private non-profit institutions.[30] 1.7 to 3 percent of Walden students defaulted on loans between 2005 and 2008. The average default rate at for-profit universities is 17.1 to 22.6 percent, and the average default rate for all US colleges is 8.4 to 12.3 percent.[31] According to the US Department of Education's College Scorecard, Walden University has a 21 percent graduation rate and a median earnings range of $26,200 (lowest) and $75,700 (highest) in the first year after graduation.[32]

Controversies[edit]

Walden University and its previous parent company Laureate International Universities were alleged to have a tie to former US Senator and Secretary of State (and Presidential candidate) Hillary Clinton, her husband, former US President Bill Clinton, and their Clinton Foundation.[33][34]Daniel Runde formally debunked many insinuating claims made regarding the Clinton Foundation, Laureate Education, and the IYF.[35] The World Bank currently has invested $150 million in Laureate Education, Walden University's parent company. Fact checkers at The Washington Post concurred, citing the claims as conflated and inaccurate.[36] Fact checkers at PolitiFact.com also found the claims to be false.[37] A story in the Sept 5, 2016 edition of The Washington Post also investigated Clinton's role with Laureate and found many of the political claims to be false.[38]

In October 2016, NBC News reported that the Minnesota Office of Higher Education was investigating a spike in student complaints.[39] NBC News further reported that former students had filed a class action suit against the school for prolonging their enrollments for years, "until they were left hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt and still short of a degree."[40]

Publications[edit]

Walden University sponsors several peer-reviewed and refereed academic journals.

References[edit]

  1. ^"About Our Accredited Online University". WaldenU.edu. Walden University. Retrieved 2015-02-26.
  2. ^https://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=walden+university&s=all&id=125231
  3. ^ abKaplan, Jonathan A. (May 4, 2010). "Testimony of Jonathan A. Kaplan, President of Walden University"(PDF). House.gov. Education and Labor Committee, US House of Representatives. Archived from the original(PDF) on November 10, 2012. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  4. ^"Sylvan Ventures invest $32.8 million in school". bizjournals.com. February 5, 2001.
  5. ^"Sylvan Gains Controlling Interest in Walden". Highbeam.com. Archived from the original on 2017-08-11. Retrieved 2017-08-10.
  6. ^"President Bill Clinton Accepts Role As Honorary Chancellor Of World's Largest University Network". thestreet.com (Press release). PRWeb. 2010-04-26. Retrieved 2014-03-26.
  7. ^"Jonathan Kaplan, J.D."WaldenU.edu. Walden University. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
  8. ^"Coursera Secures $43M in Funding From GSV Capital, IFC, Laureate Education Inc., Learn Capital and Yuri Milner to Expand Free, High Quality Online Education"(PDF). shareholder.com (Press release). Mountain View, California: GSV Capital. July 10, 2013. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  9. ^Looney, Adam; Yannelis, Constantine. "A Crisis in Student Loans? How Changes in the Characteristics of Borrowers and the Institutions they Attended Contributed to Rising Loan Defaults"(PDF). brookings.edu. Brookings Institution. Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  10. ^https://www.jbhe.com/2017/02/the-heavyweight-champion-of-black-doctoral-degree-awards/
  11. ^"The Universities Awarding the Most Doctoral Degrees to Black Scholars". Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. December 24, 2018. Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  12. ^"Survey of Earned Doctorates". National Science Foundation. Retrieved 15 September 2020.
  13. ^"IPEDS Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 15 September 2020.
  14. ^"Adtalem to Acquire Walden University From Laureate Education, Creating a National Leader in Healthcare Education". www.businesswire.com. 2020-09-11. Retrieved 2020-09-11.
  15. ^https://www.waldenu.edu/about/faculty/meet-our-faculty/member-profile/ward-ulmer
  16. ^Baylor, Elizabeth (8 July 2015). "As Graduate-Student Debt Booms, Just a Few Colleges Are Largely Responsible". The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
  17. ^"The surprising list of colleges whose financial management has the government worried". The Washington Post. March 18, 2016. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
  18. ^"FORM S-1 Registration Statement for Laureate Education, Inc". sec.gov. US Security and Exchange Commission. May 20, 2016. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  19. ^"About Our Accredited Online University". WaldenU.edu. Walden University. Retrieved 2015-02-26.
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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°58′52″N93°15′56″W / 44.98111°N 93.26556°W / 44.98111; -93.26556

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walden_University
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