React redux hooks example

React redux hooks example DEFAULT

React Hooks + Redux: CRUD example with Axios and Rest API

In this tutorial, I will show you how to build a React Redux Hooks + Axios example by a CRUD Application to consume Rest API.

Full Article: https://bezkoder.com/react-hooks-redux-crud/

Overview of React Hooks Redux CRUD example

We will build a React Redux Tutorial Application with Rest API calls in that:

  • Each Tutorial has id, title, description, published status.
  • We can create, retrieve, update, delete Tutorials.
  • There is a Search bar for finding Tutorials by title.

Here are screenshots of our React Redux CRUD Application.

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-create-tutorial

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-retrieve-tutorial

  • Click on Edit button to update a Tutorial:

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-retrieve-one-tutorial

On this Page, you can:

  • change status to Published using Publish button
  • delete the item using Delete button
  • update the item details with Update button

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-update-tutorial

  • Search Tutorials by title:

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-search-tutorial

  • Check Redux State with Dev-tool:

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-check-redux-state

This React Client consumes the following Web API:

MethodsUrlsActions
POST/api/tutorialscreate new Tutorial
GET/api/tutorialsretrieve all Tutorials
GET/api/tutorials/:idretrieve a Tutorial by
PUT/api/tutorials/:idupdate a Tutorial by
DELETE/api/tutorials/:iddelete a Tutorial by
DELETE/api/tutorialsdelete all Tutorials
GET/api/tutorials?title=[keyword]find all Tutorials which title contains

You can find step by step to build a Server like this in one of these posts:

React Hooks Redux CRUD Component Diagram with Router & Axios

Now look at the React components that we're gonna implement:

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-components

– The component is a container with React . It has that links to routes paths.

– Three pages that dispatch actions to which uses to call Rest API:

  • gets and displays Tutorials.
  • has form for editing Tutorial's details based on .
  • has form for submission new Tutorial.

– uses to make HTTP requests and receive responses.

React Hooks + Redux with API example

This diagram shows how Redux elements work in our React Hooks Application:

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-redux-store

We're gonna create Redux for storing data. Other React Components will work with the Store via dispatching an or getting value using React-Redux Hooks API.

The will take the action and return new .

Technology

  • React 17/16
  • react-redux 7.2.3
  • redux 4.0.5
  • redux-thunk 2.3.0
  • react-router-dom 5.2.0
  • axios 0.21.1
  • bootstrap 4

Project Structure

react-hooks-redux-crud-example-project-structure

I'm gonna explain it briefly.

  • package.json contains main modules: , , , , , & .
  • is the container that has & navbar.
  • There are 3 pages: , , .
  • http-common.js initializes axios with HTTP base Url and headers.
  • has methods for sending HTTP requests to the Apis.
  • .env configures port for this React CRUD App.

About Redux elements that we're gonna use:

  • actions folder contains the action creator (tutorials.js for CRUD operations and searching).
  • reducers folder contains the reducer (tutorials.js) which updates the application state corresponding to dispatched action.

For step by step and Github, please visit:
https://bezkoder.com/react-hooks-redux-crud/

Using Redux-Toolkit:
Redux-Toolkit CRUD example with React Hooks

Further Reading

Security:

Related Posts:

Serverless with Firebase:

Fullstack:

Dockerize:

Sours: https://dev.to/tienbku/react-hooks-redux-crud-example-with-axios-and-rest-api-525i

React-Redux Hooks: useSelector and useDispatch

React Redux offers a set of Hooks as an alternative to the existing higher order component. These Hooks allow you to connect to the Redux store and dispatch actions without having to wrap your components in .

This guide will cover how to implement the React-Redux Hooks, and , in your application.

Begin by installing the following in your app:

npm install reduxnpm install react-redux

The examples in this guide will be referring to my repository:

Here is a quick gif of the app’s functionality:

There are two separate states, one for keeping track of the counter and one for keeping track of a logged-in user. We will have separate files to handle each state.

Actions

Let’s begin with defining the actions for the counter in . A couple of methods are necessary, and . We will export these two methods in an object.

Similarly, let’s define the actions for the current user in , which will also have two methods, and , that will be exported in an object.

To be organized, we import these two files under one location, the file within the folder. We create a variable and set it to an object that contains the imported actions which will be exported.

Reducers

Similar to the approach taken for the actions file structure, we create separate folder to hold the user and the counter reducers. Let’s start with the counter reducer, .

A reducer function takes in two arguments, and the . State does not necessarily have to be set to an object. In this case, the default value of the state is set to an integer.

As we defined earlier, an action returns an object that can contain two keys, and optionally a . Based on the action type, the value of the state will be changed. Keep in mind that a default case is necessary in the event that an action type is called that does not exist to prevent the app from breaking.

For the current user reducer, , the state will be set to an empty object that will contain the keys and . Notice the difference in what is being returned between and . In all cases, the counter reducer returns an integer since its initial value was an integer. In the case of the current user reducer, an object is always returned.

We need to combine these reducers into one. Under , let’s import the reducer files as well as :

import {combineReducers} from 'redux'

Combine reducers does what its name implies and combines the separate reducer files into one. It takes in one argument, an object that contains the reducer files. Now that our actions and reducers are set, let’s move on to implementing Redux in our app.

In our under the folder, we will import the following:

import {Provider} from 'react-redux';
import {createStore} from 'redux'
import rootReducer from './reducers'

A Redux store will be created with the method . It takes in two arguments, the which is the file that combined our reducers and the Redux devtools extension.

Finally, we wrap our component with the component from . The component will take in one prop, store which will be set to the from .

We import the following hooks from react-redux, and . Before, we had to import from react-redux and wrap our components with it in order to map state to props and map dispatch to props.

useSelector

The equivalent of map state to props is . It takes in a function argument that returns the part of the state that you want. In this case, we have the following keys from state defined, and . We defined these earlier when combining reducers.

const counter = useSelector(state => state.counter)
// 1const currentUser = useSelector(state => state.currentUser)
// {}

Thus the variables and are set to the state defined from their respective reducers.

useDispatch

The equivalent of map dispatch to props is . We will invoke and store it to a variable, . Dispatch will work with the imported from the actions folder. For example, calls a with the following action, . User is defined as:

const user = {name: "Rei"}

Keep in mind, is an object with and as keys. Just as a refresher on the function defined in :

const setUser = (userObj) => { return { type: "SET_USER", payload: userObj }}

will return an object with and . Dispatch will take this object and look through the reducers that match the action type. In this particular case, it is located within folder.

case "SET_USER": return { ...state, user: action.payload, loggedIn: true}

And there you have it. The React-Redux hooks and are implemented in the React App. Compared to the alternative, the code is cleaner and more organized.

Thank you for reading!

Sours: https://levelup.gitconnected.com/react-redux-hooks-useselector-and-usedispatch-f7d8c7f75cdd
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react-redux with hooks is here!

In an alpha version.

The hottest thing in the React community right now is hooks. And it’s pretty sweet. It makes the code much compact and easy to read and work with.

If you use Redux with React you’re familiar with the function. This is a higher-order component that injects props to the React components with actions and data from the store.

But now that we are in 2019 you can use hooks for this instead!

A quick translation of connect()() to hooks

The official docs on this topic are extensive and in-depth. It covers many edge cases. This is a TLDR; version of the docs. I’ll only show you the happy-path. I’ll take you step-by-step and refactor an old to using the new hooks.

First an example with the old connect function

Ok so we have the function that looks something like this

The and function for a simple increase counter app looks like this:

I assume you already know how it works, if not, theseposts might help.

An (almost) complete example of a React component using our connect function looks like this:

The maps from the Redux state to the prop that is injected into the React component.

The maps an action creator to the prop that is injected into the React component.

What is not visible in this example is that the root component of the app must be wrapped inside the component.

Now let’s translate this to hooks!

First you must install the latest alpha version of . It’s the version and later that contains hooks.

The code that uses hooks looks like this:

We use two hooks: and . We use to get the data out from the store and use it in the component, and we use to be able to dispatch action creators. You don’t have to use bothand, you can only use one of them if you want.

Just as with , we must wrap the root component with for this to work.

useSelector

In this example the is very similar to the old - with one exception: it returns a value instead of an object. This is useful if your React component cares about one value from the store, like in this example.

In the old function we had to return an object even if we only wanted to use one value. We no longer have this limitation with hooks.

can however still return object if you need to extract many values from the store:

useDispatch

We no longer have access to something similar to . The way we now dispatch actions is with calling and passing in an action. We get the by calling hook.

And we dispatch it by calling passing in the return value from the action creator

More react-redux hooks

That’s it. I haven’t dig into the details, edge cases, and performance optimizations because the docs do that just perfectly: react-redux hooks docs. In the docs you can also learn about more hooks if you need more fine-grained control like .


tags:
Sours: https://blog.jakoblind.no/react-redux-hooks/
React Redux using Hooks ( NEW useSelectore \u0026 useDispatch )

Hooks

React's new "hooks" APIs give function components the ability to use local component state, execute side effects, and more. React also lets us write custom hooks, which let us extract reusable hooks to add our own behavior on top of React's built-in hooks.

React Redux includes its own custom hook APIs, which allow your React components to subscribe to the Redux store and dispatch actions.

tip

We recommend using the React-Redux hooks API as the default approach in your React components.

The existing API still works and will continue to be supported, but the hooks API is simpler and works better with TypeScript.

These hooks were first added in v7.1.0.

Using Hooks in a React Redux App​

As with , you should start by wrapping your entire application in a component to make the store available throughout the component tree:

From there, you may import any of the listed React Redux hooks APIs and use them within your function components.

Allows you to extract data from the Redux store state, using a selector function.

info

The selector function should be pure since it is potentially executed multiple times and at arbitrary points in time.

The selector is approximately equivalent to the argument to conceptually. The selector will be called with the entire Redux store state as its only argument. The selector will be run whenever the function component renders (unless its reference hasn't changed since a previous render of the component so that a cached result can be returned by the hook without re-running the selector). will also subscribe to the Redux store, and run your selector whenever an action is dispatched.

However, there are some differences between the selectors passed to and a function:

  • The selector may return any value as a result, not just an object. The return value of the selector will be used as the return value of the hook.
  • When an action is dispatched, will do a reference comparison of the previous selector result value and the current result value. If they are different, the component will be forced to re-render. If they are the same, the component will not re-render.
  • The selector function does not receive an argument. However, props can be used through closure (see the examples below) or by using a curried selector.
  • Extra care must be taken when using memoizing selectors (see examples below for more details).
  • uses strict reference equality checks by default, not shallow equality (see the following section for more details).

info

There are potential edge cases with using props in selectors that may cause issues. See the Usage Warnings section of this page for further details.

You may call multiple times within a single function component. Each call to creates an individual subscription to the Redux store. Because of the React update batching behavior used in React Redux v7, a dispatched action that causes multiple s in the same component to return new values should only result in a single re-render.

Equality Comparisons and Updates​

When the function component renders, the provided selector function will be called and its result will be returned from the hook. (A cached result may be returned by the hook without re-running the selector if it's the same function reference as on a previous render of the component.)

However, when an action is dispatched to the Redux store, only forces a re-render if the selector result appears to be different than the last result. As of v7.1.0-alpha.5, the default comparison is a strict reference comparison. This is different than , which uses shallow equality checks on the results of calls to determine if re-rendering is needed. This has several implications on how you should use .

With , all individual fields were returned in a combined object. It didn't matter if the return object was a new reference or not - just compared the individual fields. With , returning a new object every time will always force a re-render by default. If you want to retrieve multiple values from the store, you can:

  • Call multiple times, with each call returning a single field value
  • Use Reselect or a similar library to create a memoized selector that returns multiple values in one object, but only returns a new object when one of the values has changed.
  • Use the function from React-Redux as the argument to , like:

The optional comparison function also enables using something like Lodash's or Immutable.js's comparison capabilities.

Examples​

Basic usage:

Using props via closure to determine what to extract:

Using memoizing selectors​

When using with an inline selector as shown above, a new instance of the selector is created whenever the component is rendered. This works as long as the selector does not maintain any state. However, memoizing selectors (e.g. created via from ) do have internal state, and therefore care must be taken when using them. Below you can find typical usage scenarios for memoizing selectors.

When the selector does only depend on the state, simply ensure that it is declared outside of the component so that the same selector instance is used for each render:

The same is true if the selector depends on the component's props, but will only ever be used in a single instance of a single component:

However, when the selector is used in multiple component instances and depends on the component's props, you need to ensure that each component instance gets its own selector instance (see here for a more thorough explanation of why this is necessary):

This hook returns a reference to the function from the Redux store. You may use it to dispatch actions as needed.

Examples​

When passing a callback using to a child component, you may sometimes want to memoize it with . If the child component is trying to optimize render behavior using or similar, this avoids unnecessary rendering of child components due to the changed callback reference.

info

The function reference will be stable as long as the same store instance is being passed to the . Normally, that store instance never changes in an application.

However, the React hooks lint rules do not know that should be stable, and will warn that the variable should be added to dependency arrays for and . The simplest solution is to do just that:

This hook returns a reference to the same Redux store that was passed in to the component.

This hook should probably not be used frequently. Prefer as your primary choice. However, this may be useful for less common scenarios that do require access to the store, such as replacing reducers.

Examples​

Custom context​

The component allows you to specify an alternate context via the prop. This is useful if you're building a complex reusable component, and you don't want your store to collide with any Redux store your consumers' applications might use.

To access an alternate context via the hooks API, use the hook creator functions:

Usage Warnings​

Stale Props and "Zombie Children"​

info

The React-Redux hooks API has been production-ready since we released it in v7.1.0, and we recommend using the hooks API as the default approach in your components. However, there are a couple of edge cases that can occur, and we're documenting those so that you can be aware of them.

One of the most difficult aspects of React Redux's implementation is ensuring that if your function is defined as , it will be called with the "latest" props every time. Up through version 4, there were recurring bugs reported involving edge case situations, such as errors thrown from a function for a list item whose data had just been deleted.

Starting with version 5, React Redux has attempted to guarantee that consistency with . In version 7, that is implemented using a custom class internally in , which forms a nested hierarchy. This ensures that connected components lower in the tree will only receive store update notifications once the nearest connected ancestor has been updated. However, this relies on each instance overriding part of the internal React context, supplying its own unique instance to form that nesting, and rendering the with that new context value.

With hooks, there is no way to render a context provider, which means there's also no nested hierarchy of subscriptions. Because of this, the "stale props" and "zombie child" issues may potentially re-occur in an app that relies on using hooks instead of .

Specifically, "stale props" means any case where:

  • a selector function relies on this component's props to extract data
  • a parent component would re-render and pass down new props as a result of an action
  • but this component's selector function executes before this component has had a chance to re-render with those new props

Depending on what props were used and what the current store state is, this may result in incorrect data being returned from the selector, or even an error being thrown.

"Zombie child" refers specifically to the case where:

  • Multiple nested connected components are mounted in a first pass, causing a child component to subscribe to the store before its parent
  • An action is dispatched that deletes data from the store, such as a todo item
  • The parent component would stop rendering that child as a result
  • However, because the child subscribed first, its subscription runs before the parent stops rendering it. When it reads a value from the store based on props, that data no longer exists, and if the extraction logic is not careful, this may result in an error being thrown.

tries to deal with this by catching all errors that are thrown when the selector is executed due to a store update (but not when it is executed during rendering). When an error occurs, the component will be forced to render, at which point the selector is executed again. This works as long as the selector is a pure function and you do not depend on the selector throwing errors.

If you prefer to deal with this issue yourself, here are some possible options for avoiding these problems altogether with :

  • Don't rely on props in your selector function for extracting data
  • In cases where you do rely on props in your selector function and those props may change over time, or the data you're extracting may be based on items that can be deleted, try writing the selector functions defensively. Don't just reach straight into - read first, and verify that it exists before trying to read .
  • Because adds the necessary to the context provider and delays evaluating child subscriptions until the connected component has re-rendered, putting a connected component in the component tree just above the component using will prevent these issues as long as the connected component gets re-rendered due to the same store update as the hooks component.

info

For a longer description of these scenarios, see:

Performance​

As mentioned earlier, by default will do a reference equality comparison of the selected value when running the selector function after an action is dispatched, and will only cause the component to re-render if the selected value changed. However, unlike , does not prevent the component from re-rendering due to its parent re-rendering, even if the component's props did not change.

If further performance optimizations are necessary, you may consider wrapping your function component in :

Hooks Recipes​

We've pared down our hooks API from the original alpha release, focusing on a more minimal set of API primitives. However, you may still wish to use some of the approaches we tried in your own apps. These examples should be ready to copy and paste into your own codebase.

Recipe: ​

This hook was in our original alpha release, but removed in , based on Dan Abramov's suggestion. That suggestion was based on "binding action creators" not being as useful in a hooks-based use case, and causing too much conceptual overhead and syntactic complexity.

You should probably prefer to call the hook in your components to retrieve a reference to , and manually call in callbacks and effects as needed. You may also use the Redux function in your own code to bind action creators, or "manually" bind them like .

However, if you'd like to still use this hook yourself, here's a copy-pastable version that supports passing in action creators as a single function, an array, or an object.

Recipe: ​

There are some architectural trade offs to take into consideration when deciding whether to use hooks or not. Mark Erikson summarizes these nicely in his two blog posts Thoughts on React Hooks, Redux, and Separation of Concerns and Hooks, HOCs, and Tradeoffs.

Sours: https://react-redux.js.org/api/hooks

Hooks react example redux

Introduction React-Redux using Hooks (useSelector && useDispatch)

Introduction:

Before reading this article you should know about React & Redux, its working.

This article is about React-Redux Hooks. We will go through below main points in this article:

* Hooks for Redux.

* How to use Hook.

* How to use Hook.

1. Hooks for Redux

Before Hooks, we always used a which is a higher-order component and wrapper to our component, read values from the Redux store.

takes two arguments, both optional:

    called every time the store state changes. It receives the entire store state and should return an object of data this component needs.

    This parameter can either be a function, or an object. If it’s a function, it will be called once on component creation. It will receive dispatch as an argument and should return an object full of functions that use dispatch to dispatch actions.

    more about connect()

    Let's move towards react-redux hooks. React-Redux now offers a set of hook APIs as an alternative to existing Higher-Order Component. These APIs allow you to subscribe to the Redux store and dispatch actions, without having to wrap your components in . By using the Hook API with Function components, components are kept small and the code remains clean.

    Hooks:

    2. useDispatch():

    hook is equivalent of .

    We will invoke and store it to a variable, . This hook returns a to the from the Redux store. You may use it to dispatch actions as needed.
    And we dispatch it by calling dispatch passing in the return value from the action creator.

    How to use

    Below is the small component where using and

    complete code in GITHUB redux-hooks

    3.useSelector():

    hook is equivalent of

    is a function that takes the current state as an argument and returns whatever data you want from it and it allows you to store the return values inside a variable within the scope of you functional components instead of passing down as props

    complete code in GITHUB redux-hooks

    useStore():

    hook returns a reference to the same Redux store that was passed into component.

    This hook should probably not be used frequently. Prefer useSelector() as your primary choice. However, this may be useful for less common scenarios that do require access to the store, such as replacing reducers.

    complete code in GITHUB redux-hooks

    If you wanna learn more about and here it's official link React Redux Hooks

    Further improvement, suggestion or help. Welcome :)

    Sours: https://dev.to/bangash1996/introduction-react-redux-using-hooks-useselector-usedispatch-26ch
    Learn React Redux with Project - Redux Axios REST API Tutorial - React Redux Tutorial For Beginners

    React Hooks + Redux: CRUD example with Axios and Rest API

    In this tutorial, I will show you how to build a React Hooks + Redux CRUD Application example to consume Rest API, display and modify data with Router, Axios & Bootstrap.

    Security:
    – React Hooks: JWT Authentication (without Redux) example
    – React Hooks + Redux: JWT Authentication example

    Related Posts:
    – React CRUD example with Axios and Web API (using React Components)
    – React Hooks (without Redux) CRUD example with Axios and Web API
    – React Hooks File Upload example with Axios & Progress Bar
    – React Table example: CRUD App | react-table 7
    – React Form Validation with Hooks example

    Serverless with Firebase:
    – React Hooks + Firebase Realtime Database: CRUD App
    – React Hooks + Firestore example: CRUD app

    Contents

    Overview of React Hooks Redux CRUD example

    We will build a React Redux Tutorial Application with Rest API calls in that:

    • Each Tutorial has id, title, description, published status.
    • We can create, retrieve, update, delete Tutorials.
    • There is a Search bar for finding Tutorials by title.

    Here are screenshots of our React Redux CRUD Application.

    – Create a Tutorial:

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-create-tutorial

    – Retrieve all Tutorials:

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-retrieve-tutorial

    – Click on Edit button to update a Tutorial:

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-retrieve-one-tutorial

    On this Page, you can:

    • change status to Published using Publish button
    • delete the item using Delete button
    • update the item details with Update button

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-update-tutorial

    If you need Form Validation with React Hook Form 7, please visit:
    React Form Validation with Hooks example

    – Search Tutorials by title:

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-search-tutorial

    – Check Redux State with Dev-tool:

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-check-redux-state

    This React Client consumes the following Web API:

    MethodsUrlsActions
    POST/api/tutorialscreate new Tutorial
    GET/api/tutorialsretrieve all Tutorials
    GET/api/tutorials/:idretrieve a Tutorial by
    PUT/api/tutorials/:idupdate a Tutorial by
    DELETE/api/tutorials/:iddelete a Tutorial by
    DELETE/api/tutorialsdelete all Tutorials
    GET/api/tutorials?title=[keyword]find all Tutorials which title contains

    You can find step by step to build a Server like this in one of these posts:
    – Express, Sequelize & MySQL
    – Express, Sequelize & PostgreSQL
    – Express, Sequelize & SQL Server
    – Express & MongoDb
    – Spring Boot & MySQL
    – Spring Boot & PostgreSQL
    – Spring Boot & MongoDB
    – Spring Boot & SQL Server
    – Spring Boot & H2
    – Spring Boot & Cassandra
    – Spring Boot & Oracle
    – Django & MySQL
    – Django & PostgreSQL
    – Django & MongoDB

    React Hooks Redux CRUD Component Diagram with Router & Axios

    Now look at the React components that we’re gonna implement:

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-components

    – The component is a container with React . It has that links to routes paths.

    – Three pages that dispatch actions to which uses to call Rest API:

    • gets and displays Tutorials.
    • has form for editing Tutorial’s details based on .
    • has form for submission new Tutorial.

    – uses to make HTTP requests and receive responses.

    React Hooks + Redux with API example

    This diagram shows how Redux elements work in our React Hooks Application:

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-redux-store-architecture

    We’re gonna create Redux for storing data. Other React Components will work with the Store via dispatching an or getting value using React-Redux Hooks API.

    The will take the action and return new .

    Technology

    • React 17/16
    • react-redux 7.2.3
    • redux 4.0.5
    • redux-thunk 2.3.0
    • react-router-dom 5.2.0
    • axios 0.21.1
    • bootstrap 4

    Project Structure

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-project-structure

    I’m gonna explain it briefly.

    package.json contains main modules: , , , , , & .
    – is the container that has & navbar.
    – There are 3 pages: , , .
    http-common.js initializes axios with HTTP base Url and headers.
    – has methods for sending HTTP requests to the Apis.
    .env configures port for this React CRUD App.

    About Redux elements that we’re gonna use:
    actions folder contains the action creator (tutorials.js for CRUD operations and searching).
    reducers folder contains the reducer (tutorials.js) which updates the application state corresponding to dispatched action.

    If you want to use Redux-Toolkit instead, please visit:
    Redux-Toolkit CRUD example with React Hooks

    Setup React.js Project

    Open cmd at the folder you want to save Project folder, run command:

    After the process is done. We create additional folders and files like the following tree:


    public

    src

    actions

    types.js

    tutorials.js (create/retrieve/update/delete actions)

    reducers

    index.js

    tutorials.js

    components

    AddTutorial.js

    Tutorial.js

    TutorialsList.js

    services

    TutorialService.js

    App.css

    App.js

    index.js

    store.js

    package.json


    Install Bootstrap to React Hooks Redux CRUD App

    Run command: .

    Open src/App.js and modify the code inside it as following-

    Add React Router to React Hooks Redux CRUD App

    – Run the command: .
    – Open src/App.js and wrap all UI elements by object.

    Add Navbar to React Hooks Redux CRUD App

    The component is the root container for our application, it will contain a inside above, and also, a object with several . Each points to a React Component.

    Now App.js looks like:

    Initialize Axios for React Hooks Redux CRUD HTTP Client

    Let’s install axios with command: .
    Under src folder, we create http-common.js file with following code:

    You can change the that depends on REST APIs url that your Server configures.

    For more details about ways to use Axios, please visit:
    Axios request: Get/Post/Put/Delete example

    Create Data Service

    In this step, we’re gonna create a service that uses axios object above to send HTTP requests.
    The service exports CRUD functions and finder method:

    • CREATE:
    • RETRIEVE: ,
    • UPDATE:
    • DELETE: ,
    • FINDER:

    services/TutorialService.js

    We call axios (imported as http) , , , method corresponding to HTTP Requests: GET, POST, PUT, DELETE to make CRUD Operations.

    Create Redux Actions

    We’re gonna create actions in src/actions folder:


    actions

    types.js

    tutorials.js (create/retrieve/update/delete actions)


    Action Types

    First we defined some string constant that indicates the type of action being performed.

    actions/type.js

    Actions Creator

    This is creator for actions related to tutorials. We’re gonna import to make asynchronous HTTP requests with trigger on the result.

    • calls the
    • dispatch

    • calls the
    • dispatch

    • calls the
    • dispatch

    • calls the
    • dispatch

    • calls the
    • dispatch

    • calls the
    • dispatch

    Some action creators return a for Components using them.

    actions/tutorials.js

    You can simplify import statement with:
    Absolute Import in React

    Create Redux Reducer

    There will be a reducer in src/reducers folder, the reducer updates the state corresponding to dispatched Redux actions.


    reducers

    index.js

    tutorials.js


    Tutorials Reducer

    The reducer will update state of the Redux store:
    reducers/tutorials.js

    Combine Reducers

    reducers/index.js

    Because we only have a single store in a Redux application. We use reducer composition instead of many stores to split data handling logic.

    For example, if you have Auth Reducer that manages authentication logic, you can use like following code:

    Create Redux Store

    This Store will bring Actions and Reducers together and hold the Application state.

    Now we need to install Redux, Thunk Middleware and Redux Devtool Extension.
    Run the command:

    In the previous section, we used to combine 2 reducers into one. Let’s import it, and pass it to :

    store.js

    Provide State to React Components

    We start by wrapping our entire application in a component to make the available to its child components.

    Open src/index.js

    Create React Components

    Now we’re gonna build 3 components corresponding to 3 Routes defined before.

    Add Object

    This component has a Form to submit new Tutorial with 2 fields: & .

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-create-tutorial

    components/AddTutorial.js

    First, we define and set initial state: & .

    Next, we create function to track the values of the input and set that state for changes.

    We also have a function to get local state and send the POST request to the Web API. It dispatchs action with action creator with . This hook returns a reference to the function from the Redux store.

    For , we check the state, if it is true, we show Add button for creating new Tutorial again. Otherwise, a Form with Submit button will display.

    List of Objects

    This component has:

    • a search bar for finding Tutorials by title.
    • a tutorials array displayed as a list on the left.
    • a selected Tutorial which is shown on the right.

    react-hooks-redux-crud-example-retrieve-tutorial

    Beside global state , we also have following local state:

    • and

    We also need to use 3 action creators:

      To connect the Redux store with local Component state and props, we use and .

      When using with an inline selector above, a new instance of the selector is created whenever the component is rendered.

      Now we can work with state and dispatch actions like this:

      components/TutorialsList.js

      Let’s continue to implement UI elements:

      If you click on Edit button of any Tutorial, the app will direct you to Tutorial page.
      We use React Router for accessing that page with url: .

      Object details

      react-hooks-redux-crud-example-retrieve-one-tutorial

      This component will use method in the Effect Hook to get Tutorial by id in the URL.

      For update, delete the Tutorial, we work with following action creators:

        components/Tutorial.js

        And this is the code inside :

        Add CSS style for React Components

        Open src/App.css and write CSS code as following:

        Configure Port for React Redux CRUD with Web API

        Because most of HTTP Server use CORS configuration that accepts resource sharing retrictted to some sites or ports, so we also need to configure port for our App.

        In project folder, create .env file with following content:

        Now we’ve set our app running at port .

        Run React Hooks Redux CRUD App

        You can run our App with command: .
        If the process is successful, open Browser with Url: and check it.

        This React Client will work well with following back-end Rest APIs:
        – Express, Sequelize & MySQL
        – Express, Sequelize & PostgreSQL
        – Express, Sequelize & SQL Server
        – Express & MongoDb
        – Spring Boot & MySQL
        – Spring Boot & PostgreSQL
        – Spring Boot & MongoDB
        – Spring Boot & SQL Server
        – Spring Boot & H2
        – Spring Boot & Cassandra
        – Spring Boot & Oracle
        – Django & MySQL
        – Django & PostgreSQL
        – Django & MongoDB

        Conclusion

        Today we’ve built a React Hooks Redux CRUD example successfully with React Router & Axios. Now we can consume REST APIs, display, search and modify data with Redux Store in a clean way. I hope you can make API call (GET/POST/PUT/DELETE) in your project at ease.

        If you don’t want to use Redux:
        React Hooks (without Redux) CRUD example with Axios and Web API

        Implement Security:
        – React Hooks: JWT Authentication (without Redux) example
        – React Hooks + Redux: JWT Authentication example

        You can add Pagination Component:
        React Pagination using Hooks example

        react-pagination-hooks-material-ui-change-page

        Or Form Validation:
        React Form Validation with Hooks example

        Happy learning, see you again!

        Further Reading

        For more details about ways to use Axios, please visit:
        Axios request: Get/Post/Put/Delete example

        Fullstack:
        – Spring Boot + React Redux example: Build a CRUD App
        – React + Spring Boot + MySQL: CRUD example
        – React + Spring Boot + PostgreSQL: CRUD example
        – React + Spring Boot + MongoDB: CRUD example
        – React + Node.js + Express + MySQL: CRUD example
        – React Redux + Node.js + Express + MySQL: CRUD example
        – React + Node.js + Express + PostgreSQL example
        – React + Node.js + Express + MongoDB example
        – React + Django + Rest Framework example

        Source Code

        You can find the complete source code for this example on Github.

        Using Redux-Toolkit instead:
        Redux-Toolkit CRUD example with React Hooks

        Sours: https://www.bezkoder.com/react-hooks-redux-crud/

        You will also be interested:

        React Hooks + Redux - User Registration and Login Tutorial & Example

        Tutorial built with React 16.13, React Hooks and Redux 4.0.5

        Other versions available:

        In this tutorial we'll cover how to implement user registration and login functionality with React Hooks and Redux. The tutorial example is a boilerplate application built with React functional components that uses React hooks to implement JWT authentication, it's an update of this tutorial that is built using tradional React class components. For more info on React hooks see https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-intro.html.

        Styling of the React hooks example is all done with Bootstrap 4.4 CSS.

        For an extended version that includes email verification, role based authorization and forgot password functionality see React Boilerplate - Email Sign Up with Verification, Authentication & Forgot Password.

        The tutorial project is available on GitHub at https://github.com/cornflourblue/react-hooks-redux-registration-login-example.

        Here it is in action:(See on StackBlitz at https://stackblitz.com/edit/react-hooks-redux-registration-login-example)

        Update History:

        • 31 Aug 2020 - Implemented redirect to previous page after login
        • 02 Mar 2020 - Built tutorial with React 16.13.0 and Redux 4.0.5


        Running the React Hooks + Redux Tutorial Example Locally

        1. Install NodeJS and NPM from https://nodejs.org
        2. Download or clone the project source code from https://github.com/cornflourblue/react-hooks-redux-registration-login-example
        3. Install all required npm packages by running from the command line in the project root folder (where the package.json is located).
        4. Start the application by running from the command line in the project root folder, this will launch a browser displaying the application.

        For more info on setting up a React development environment see React - Setup Development Environment.


        Running the React Hooks Example with a Real Backend API

        The react hooks example app uses a fake / mock backend that uses browser local storage for managing application data, to switch to a real backend api you just have to remove a couple of lines of code from the main react entry file ().

        You can build your own backend api or start with one of the below options:


        Deploying the React Hooks App to AWS

        The below video shows how to setup a production ready web server from scratch on AWS, then deploy the previous version of this tutorial app (built without React hooks) and configure it to run with a real Node.js + MongoDB backend api. The deployment steps are exactly the same for this updated "React hooks" version of the app, you just need to use this project's github repo URL instead when deploying the front end.

        The tutorial used in the video is available at React + Node.js on AWS - How to Deploy a MERN Stack App to Amazon EC2.


        Deploying the React Hooks App to Microsoft Azure

        For instructions on how to deploy the previous version of this React app (built without React hooks) to Azure with a real backend api built with ASP.NET Core and SQL Server see React + ASP.NET Core on Azure with SQL Server - How to Deploy a Full Stack App to Microsoft Azure. The deployment steps are exactly the same for this updated "React hooks" version of the app, you just need to use this project's github repo URL instead when deploying the front end.


        React Hooks + Redux Tutorial Project Structure

        All source code for the React Hooks + Redux tutorial app is located in the folder. Inside the src folder there is a folder per feature (App, HomePage, LoginPage, RegisterPage) and a bunch of folders for non-feature code that can be shared across different parts of the app (_actions, _components, _constants, _helpers, _reducers, _services).

        I prefixed non-feature folders with an underscore "_" to group them together and make it easy to distinguish between features and non-features, it also keeps the project folder structure shallow so it's quick to see everything at a glance from the top level and to navigate around the project.

        The index.js files in each folder are barrel files that group all the exported modules together so they can be imported using the folder path instead of the full module path and to enable importing multiple modules in a single import (e.g. ).

        Click any of the below links to jump down to a description of each file along with it's code:


        Redux Actions Folder

        Path: /src/_actions

        The _actions folder contains all the Redux action creators for the project, I've organised the action creators into different files by action type (e.g. user actions, alert actions etc).

        If you're not familiar with Redux actions or action creators you can learn about them at https://redux.js.org/basics/actions.

        Back to top


        Redux Alert Action Creators

        Path: /src/_actions/alert.actions.js

        Contains Redux action creators for actions related to alerts / toaster notifications in the application. For example to display a success alert message with the text 'Registration Successful' you can call .

        I've wrapped the action methods in an object at the top of the file so it's easy to see all available actions at a glance and simplifies importing them into other files. The implementation details for each action creator are placed in the below functions.

        Back to top


        Redux User Action Creators

        Path: /src/_actions/user.actions.js

        Contains Redux action creators for actions related to users. Public action creators are exposed via the object at the top of the file and function implementations are located below, I like this structure because you can quickly see all of the actions that are available.

        Most of the actions for users are async actions that are made up of multiple sub actions, this is because they have to make an http request and wait for the response before completing. Async actions typically dispatch a action before performing an async task (e.g. an http request), and then dispatch a or action based on the result of the async task.

        For example the action creator performs the following steps:

        1. dispatches a action with
        2. calls the async task
        3. dispatches a with if login was successful, or dispatches a action with if login failed

        To keep the code tidy I've put sub action creators into nested functions within each async action creator function. For example the function contains 3 nested action creator functions for , and that return the actions , and respectively. Putting the sub action creators into nested functions also allows me to give them standard names like request, success and failure without clashing with other function names because they only exist within the scope of the parent function.

        Back to top


        React Components Folder

        Path: /src/_components

        The _components folder contains shared React components that can be used anywhere in the application.

        Back to top


        React Private Route Component

        Path: /src/_components/PrivateRoute.jsx

        The react private route component renders a route component if the user is logged in, otherwise it redirects the user to the page with the return url that they were trying to access.

        The way it checks if the user is logged in is by checking that there is a object in local storage. While it's possible to bypass this check by manually adding an object to local storage using browser dev tools, this would only give access to the client side component, it wouldn't give access to any real secure data from the server api because a valid authentication token (JWT) is required for this.

        Back to top


        Redux Action Constants Folder

        Path: /src/_constants

        The _constants folder contains all of the redux action type constants used by redux action creators and reducers. It could be used for any other constants in the project as well, it doesn't have to be only for redux action types.

        I decided to put redux action constants into their own files (rather than the same files as redux actions) to simplify my redux action files and keep them focused on one thing.

        Back to top


        Redux Alert Action Constants

        Path: /src/_constants/alert.constants.js

        The alert constants object contains the redux alert action types used to display and clear alerts in the react application.

        Back to top


        Redux User Action Constants

        Path: /src/_constants/user.constants.js

        The user constants object contains the redux user action types that can be dispatched in the react application, async actions that perform http requests involve a request followed by a success or error response, so each of these three steps is represented by a redux action.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux Helpers Folder

        Path: /src/_helpers

        The helpers folder contains all the bits and pieces that don't fit into other folders but don't justify having a folder of their own.

        Back to top


        React Auth Header

        Path: /src/_helpers/auth-header.js

        Auth header is a helper function that returns an HTTP Authorization header containing the Json Web Token (JWT) of the currently logged in user from local storage. If the user isn't logged in an empty object is returned.

        The auth header is used to make authenticated HTTP requests to the server api using JWT authentication.

        Back to top


        React Fake / Mock Backend

        Path: /src/_helpers/fake-backend.js

        The fake backend is used for running the tutorial example without a server api (backend-less). It monkey patches the function to intercept certain api requests and mimic the behaviour of a real api by managing data in browser local storage. Any requests that aren't intercepted get passed through to the real function.

        Back to top


        React Router History

        Path: /src/_helpers/history.js

        The history is a custom history object used by the React Router, the reason I used a custom history object instead of the built into React Router is to enable redirecting users from outside React components, for example from the user actions after successful login or registration.

        Back to top


        Redux Store

        Path: /src/_helpers/store.js

        The redux store helper calls to create the centralized redux state store for the entire react application.

        Back to top


        Redux Reducers Folder

        Path: /src/_reducers

        The _reducers folder contains all the Redux reducers for the project, each reducer updates a different part of the application state in response to dispatched redux actions.

        If you're not familiar with Redux reducers you can learn about them at https://redux.js.org/basics/reducers.

        Back to top


        Redux Alert Reducer

        Path: /src/_reducers/alert.reducer.js

        The redux alert reducer manages the application state for alerts / toaster notifications, it updates state when an alert action is dispatched from anywhere in the application, for example when an action is dispatched, the reducer updates the alert state to an object with and .

        Back to top


        Redux Authentication Reducer

        Path: /src/_reducers/authentication.reducer.js

        The redux authentication reducer manages the state related to login (and logout) actions, on successful login the current user object and a loggedIn flag are stored in the section of the application state. On logout or login failure the authentication state is set to an empty object, and during login (between login request and success/failure) the authentication state has a loggingIn flag set to true and a user object with the details of the user that is attempting to login.

        Back to top


        Redux Registration Reducer

        Path: /src/_reducers/registration.reducer.js

        The redux registration reducer manages the section of the application state, as you can see there isn't much to it, on registration request it just sets a flag set to true which the RegisterPage uses to show the loading spinner. On register success or failure it clears the registration state.

        Back to top


        Redux Users Reducer

        Path: /src/_reducers/users.reducer.js

        The redux users reducer manages the section of the application state which is used by the HomePage to display a list of users and enable deleting of users.

        Back to top


        React Services Folder

        Path: /src/_services

        The _services layer handles all http communication with backend apis for the application, each service encapsulates the api calls for a content type (e.g. users) and exposes methods for performing various operations (e.g. CRUD operations). Services can also have methods that don't wrap http calls, for example the method just removes an item from local storage.

        I like wrapping http calls and implementation details in a services layer, it provides a clean separation of concerns and simplifies the redux actions (and other modules) that use the services.

        Back to top


        React User Service

        Path: /src/_services/user.service.js

        The user service encapsulates all backend api calls for performing CRUD operations on user data, as well as logging and out of the example application. The service methods are exported via the object at the top of the file, and the implementation of each method is located in the function declarations below.

        In the method the service checks if the http response from the api is and automatically logs the user out. This handles if the JWT token expires or is no longer valid for any reason.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux App Folder

        Path: /src/App

        The app folder is for react components and other code that is used only by the app component in the tutorial application.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux App Component

        Path: /src/App/App.jsx

        The app react hooks component is the root component for the react tutorial application, it contains the outer html, routes and global alert notification for the example app. If the url path doesn't match any route there is a default redirect defined below the routes that redirects the user to the home page.

        The second parameter to the React hook is an array of dependencies that determines when the hook is run, passing an empty array causes the hook to only be run once when the component first loads, like the lifecyle method in a traditional React class component. For more info on React hooks see https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-intro.html.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux Home Page Folder

        Path: /src/HomePage

        The home page folder is for react components and other code that is used only by the home page component in the tutorial application.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux Home Page Component

        Path: /src/HomePage/HomePage.jsx

        The home page is a react hooks component that is displayed after signing in to the application, it shows the signed in user's name plus a list of all registered users in the tutorial application. The users are loaded into redux state by calling from the React hook, which dispatches the redux action .

        Users can also be deleted from the user list, when the delete link is clicked it calls the function which dispatches the redux action .

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux Login Page Folder

        Path: /src/LoginPage

        The login page folder is for react components and other code that is used only by the login page component in the tutorial application.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux Login Page Component

        Path: /src/LoginPage/LoginPage.jsx

        The login page is a react hooks component that renders a login form with username and password fields. It displays validation messages for invalid fields when the user attempts to submit the form. If the form is valid, submitting it causes the to be called, which dispatches the redux action .

        The hook function calls which dispatches the redux action to log the user out if they are logged in, this enables the login page to also be used as the logout page.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux Register Page Folder

        Path: /src/RegisterPage

        The register page folder is for react components and other code that is used only by the register page component in the tutorial application.

        Back to top


        React Hooks + Redux Register Page Component

        Path: /src/RegisterPage/RegisterPage.jsx

        The register page is a react hooks component that renders a simple registration form with fields for first name, last name, username and password. It displays validation messages for invalid fields when the user attempts to submit the form. If the form is valid, submitting it calls which dispatches the redux action .

        The user login status is reset to 'logged out' when the component loads by calling from a react hook function. The second parameter to the react hook is an array of dependencies that determines when it is executed, passing an empty array causes the hook to only be run once when the component first loads, like the lifecyle method in a traditional react class component. For more info on react hooks see https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-intro.html.

        Back to top


        Base Index HTML File

        Path: /src/index.html

        The base index html file contains the outer html for the whole tutorial application. When the app is started with , Webpack bundles up all of the react hooks + redux code into a single javascript file and injects it into the body of the page.

        Back to top


        Main React Entry File

        Path: /src/index.jsx

        The root index.jsx file bootstraps the react hooks + redux tutorial application by rendering the component (wrapped in a redux ) into the div element defined in the base index html file above.

        The boilerplate application uses a fake / mock backend that stores data in browser local storage, to switch to a real backend api simply remove the fake backend code below the comment .

        Back to top


        React Hooks Tutorial Babel RC (Run Commands)

        Path: /.babelrc

        The babel config file defines the presets used by babel to transpile the React and ES6 code. The babel transpiler is run by webpack via the module configured in the webpack.config.js file below.

        Back to top


        React Hooks Tutorial Package.json

        Path: /package.json

        The package.json file contains project configuration information including package dependencies which get installed when you run . Full documentation is available on the npm docs website.

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        React Webpack Config

        Path: /webpack.config.js

        Webpack is used to compile and bundle all the project files so they're ready to be loaded into a browser, it does this with the help of loaders and plugins that are configured in the webpack.config.js file. For more info about webpack check out the webpack docs.

        The webpack config file also defines a global config object for the application using the property, you can also use this to define different config variables for your development and production environments.

        Back to top

         

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        I'm currently attempting to travel around Australia by motorcycle with my wife Tina on a pair of Royal Enfield Himalayans. You can follow our adventures on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook.


        Need Some React Help?

        Search fiverr to find help quickly from experienced React developers.



        Sours: https://jasonwatmore.com


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