Cheap 3d 4k tv

Cheap 3d 4k tv DEFAULT
3D may be all but dead, at least on TV, but plenty of 3D films are still coming out in theaters and on Blu-ray. "The Hobbit." "Pacific Rim." "Man of Steel." "Thor: The Dark World." "The Wolverine." "Cars." "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2." "Gravity."

And numerous TVs are available with 3D capability -- and include the requisite glasses -- to handle playing those movies in the home. Until now, however, they all demanded severe picture quality sacrifices when you donned the glasses.

That is, until 4K resolution TVs with passive 3D came along. I just finished reviewing my first one, Toshiba's 65LU, and it delivered the cleanest, most artifact-free 3D image of any TV I've had in the lab. If you care about 3D TV -- and don't worry, I won't judge you if you don't -- you'll want to experience one for yourself.

Damned if you're active, damned if you're passive
3D on TVs comes two flavors today: active and passive. The most obvious difference is in the glasses. Active glasses use liquid-crystal shutters that run on batteries, while passive glasses use simple polarizing lenses, similar to what you'll get in most US 3D theaters. Passive glasses are as cheap as a few bucks apiece, while active glasses start at $20 and go up from there.

In terms of picture quality, both come with significant compromises.

Active 3D systems are typically subject to crosstalk, my least favorite 3D-specific artifact. Crosstalk typically appears as a second ghostly image or outline around an onscreen object; I find it a major distraction that ruins the experience in some cases. Some active 3D TVs deal with it better than others, but passive 3D TVs are virtually crosstalk-free.

On the other hand, passive 3D TVs deliver lower resolution. On a p TV (1,x1,pixel resolution), each eye is only seeing 1,x pixels due to the polarized lenses blocking half the lines. If your screen is big, or you're sitting close, you're going to see what look like alternating horizontal lines, as in black lines in between the active image (see images below). Even if those aren't visible, the jagged diagonal lines they cause might be.

Beyond their economic advantages, passive glasses are easier to use and wear. Since they don't have electronics or batteries, they're lighter and more comfortable, and come in many designs, including designer and clip-on versions for people who wear regular glasses. They also don't introduce flicker when you're multitasking with a laptop, phone, or other screen while wearing them, nor under bright fluorescent lighting.

Active glasses flicker in both circumstances, but in our experience they don't usually introduce visible flicker when you're actually watching 3D TV (people especially sensitive to flicker might still see it, though). They do need to be turned on and synced with the TV, although that's usually a simple process. Their batteries also need to be periodically replaced or recharged, typically via a USB port.

So, to sum it up, if it wasn't for their lower resolution and artifacts, passive 3D would be the hands-down better choice. That's where 4K comes in.

The benefits of 4K resolution are obviouswith passive 3D
At CNET we've spent a lot of time looking for appreciable benefits of 4K-resolution TVs, and so far we've come up pretty much empty. It bears repeating: With video on a TV, the difference between 4K/UHD and p/HD resolution is really hard to see. In our tests of 4K TVs so far, despite all the extra pixels I knew made up the 4K TV's screen, most of the time I didn't see any difference at all, especially with HD TV shows and Blu-rays.

When a 4K resolution TV uses passive 3D, however, the extra pixels play a much more obvious role. You still lose half the vertical resolution, but since there are so many more pixels, you can afford to lose it. 4K TVs (3,x2,pixel resolution) with passive 3D, like the Toshiba LU, can still deliver greater than HD resolution in 3D, at 3,x1, pixels per eye.

The improvement was profound compared with p, as I noted in my review:

The first thing I said to myself when I compared the inch passive 3D Vizio, which has p resolution, with the inch passive 3D Toshiba, which has 4K, was "wow." The line structure, jagged edges, and related artifacts I've come to associate with passive 3D in p -- for example, along the edges of the words "Paramount," "infinitum nihil" and "GK films" at the beginning of "Hugo" -- were gone from the Toshiba, leaving clean, smooth 3D. Even the graphical elements of my PS3's display looked better.

The Toshiba's resolution superiority was immediately obvious in program material, too. From the first still shots, of a lamp hanging over the concourse and the railing above, solid areas and lines alike again looked cleaner. I looked at the trouble areas in the film as well, in particular where the camera moved over a scene that contained a horizontal edge at a shallow angle. Examples, like Uncle Claude's bowler hat () and the edge of a low wall outside the station (), were likewise clean. The 3D image looked as sharp as on any of the active 3D TVs in our lineup, including the Panasonic WT and our reference F

In fact, since the Toshiba doesn't suffer nearly as much crosstalk as those two (or any active 3D set we've tested), it seemed even sharper.

It's also worth noting that on a 4K TV with active 3D, there's no similarly major improvement compared to the p version. When I compared the 3D of the Samsung UN65F, a 4K TV, to that of the UN55F, its p doppelganger, they were almost identical.

Tough to find, but worth seeing
Only the following 3D TVs offer the combination of 4K resolution and passive 3D: Toshiba LU series; Sony XA series; LG LA and LA series.

Unfortunately for 3D fans, this killer combination looks to be equally scarce in The only forthcoming 4K TVs I know about with passive 3D are the LG UB and UB series LED LCDs, the LG 77EC and as-yet-unnamed inch and inch OLEDs, and the Sony XBR-XB series LED LCD. I asked Panasonic whether its 4K TC-AXU series employs passive 3D, and will update this article when I find out.

The other two Sony 4K series for , the XB and XB, employ active 3D, as do all Samsung 3D TVs. Vizio, formerly a major champion of passive 3D, will not offer any kind of 3D on its TVs, including the 4K P series and R series. Toshiba also says none of its TVs will offer 3D, including the 4K L and L

So there you have it. If you're one of the rare people who care enough about 3D picture quality to factor it into your buying decision, be sure to audition a 4K resolution TV with passive 3D. It's a visual treat.

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/tech/home-entertainment/4k-tvs-with-passive-3d-finally-a-good-use-for-all-those-pixels/

Cheap 3D TVs

How to buy

There are 3 easy ways to buy:


Home delivery:

- We have now started delivering right to your door! Alternatively you can collect free of charge from one of our 7 branches (see steps below)

- Not all items are available for home delivery, however, for example plasma televisions due to weight restrictions and clearance items. Items available for home delivery will have the 'delivery available' icon visible on the specific product page just above the price.

- You can pay in full online and follow the steps on the website, charges will be added to your order when 'standard delivery' option is selected.

- Alternatively, you can pay in full over the phone via our sales team available on

- Delivery can take a minimum of 2 working days, depending on stock availability.

Please note: We can only deliver to the card billing address for security reasons. If delivery address and card address do not match we may ask to see ID to confirm your identity and/or address. This can be done by via email.


Pay online and collect:

- Click on "Buy Now" which will take you to the shopping basket. Follow the details online.

- You will be asked to select 1 of the 6 3Pins depots from where you would like to collect your TV (see the 'Store Locator' on the bottom right corner of the website for more details on the 6 3Pins locations).

- Follow the step by step payment pages to complete your order.

- We will transfer your TV free of charge to your chosen 3Pins depot and will telephone you to arrange a mutually convenient time for you to collect your purchase. You should take the card you paid with, and proof of name and address details with you when you go to collect (driving license/house bill/bank statement). The TV will be demonstrated to you and then it is yours to take away!

Please note: Failure to produce the card and relevant ID means we are unable to release goods on collection.


Or


Pay a deposit over the phone and remaining balance on collection:

- Ring our dedicated sales team on (During office hours Monday-Saturday 9ampm) to pay a £50 deposit by credit/debit card over the phone. This will reserve the TV for you.

- We will transfer the TV free of charge to your choice of 3Pins depot and will telephone you to arrange a mutually convenient time for you to collect your purchase.

- You can pay the balance on collection by cash or credit/debit card. You should take the card you paid with and proof of name and address details with you when you go to collect (driving license/house bill/bank statement). The TV will be demonstrated to you and then it is yours to take away! Please note: Failure to produce the card and relevant ID means we are unable to release goods on collection

Please note your credit/debit card WILL NOT BE CHARGED until we have arranged the transfer of the TV to your chosen 3Pins branch. We DO NOT charge for items that are out of stock until the item is in stock and arrangements for collection have been made.

There is free parking outside each 3Pins depot

Please see the FAQ page for more information on buying from us

Sours: http://www.3pins.co.uk/cheap-3d-tvs
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4K 3D LED TV

4K 3D TVs are the best choice for you if you do not want to compromise on the 3d cinematic experience available today. Built on the latest 4K display technology, the TVs feature a resolution four times more than the conventional HD televisions. 4K means the horizontal resolution measured in the order of 4, pixels assuring a more colourful, brighter and better image than what you will find on conventional pictures. The specifications like resolution, refresh rate, Dolby Digital sound system and other connectivity features determine the overall viewing experience of the Television. Top manufacturers delivering 4K 3D TV appliances are LG, Lloyd, Sony Bravia, Vu, Panasonic, Samsung, Hyundai and Sony. The following price list contains 12 handpicked 4K 3D TV sets last updated on 13th October

Samsung 4K UHD TV PriceLG 4K UHD TV PriceSony 4K UHD TV PriceMicromax 4K LED TVPanasonic 4K UHD TV PriceSamsung 55 Inch 4K UHD TV PriceLG 55 Inch 4K UHD TV PriceLG 65 Inch 4K UHD TV PriceSamsung 4K 3D LED TV48 Inch 4K 3D LED TV

Sours: https://www.mysmartprice.com/electronics/pricelist/4k-3d-led-tv-price-list-in-india.html
Edison 3D - Make ANY TV a 3DTV

Cheap 3D TVs - Our Latest Deals

  • 55 Panasonic TX55CXB Ultra HD 4K Freeview HD Smart 3D LED TV

    £

    WAS £

    LED

    Television Type: LED

    Graded: Yes

    "Graded" televisions are items that High Street retailers can't sell on for various reasons. This may be because the TVs are surplus stock, end of line/discontined models, 30 day customer returns, unwanted gifts, or items with damaged packaging.

    When the TVs come into us at Electronic World they are technically tested, processed, repackaged and offered for sale. Before sale, all televisions undergo a comprehensive quality control process by our engineers. In the majority of cases the item will be supplied with its original packaging and will be in excellent condition and are classed as "Grade A" - the items we sell are not used but can have minor signs of handling. If the original packaging is not supplied we will supply other secure packaging to keep the TV well protected in transit. Items are generally in excellent condition but can have some small marks on the outer casing/stand. Screens will be pristine unless otherwise mentioned. If there are any defects or noticeable marks/scratches we will attach pictures of the item and the description will detail any cosmetic damage on the items.

    All TVs sold on this website carry a 12 month 'return to base' warranty provided by ourselves (unless otherwise stated). Our guarantee on all of our products demonstrates our confidence in each and every product we sell. Upon collection the TV is unwrapped and you are given a demonstration of the TV for your peace of mind. This really is an amazing way to save hundreds off "Brand New" prices without sacrificing any of the quality or performance!

    General: 4K Ultra HD

    Picture: 3D TV Ready, 2D-3D

    Smart: Screen Mirroring, Facebook/Twitter, YouTube, BBC iPlayer/YouTube, Smart TV

    VIEW DETAILS

  • 55 LG 55EFV OLED 4K Ultra HD Freeview HD Smart 3D TV

    £

    WAS £

    OLED

    Graded: Yes

    "Graded" televisions are items that High Street retailers can't sell on for various reasons. This may be because the TVs are surplus stock, end of line/discontined models, 30 day customer returns, unwanted gifts, or items with damaged packaging.

    When the TVs come into us at Electronic World they are technically tested, processed, repackaged and offered for sale. Before sale, all televisions undergo a comprehensive quality control process by our engineers. In the majority of cases the item will be supplied with its original packaging and will be in excellent condition and are classed as "Grade A" - the items we sell are not used but can have minor signs of handling. If the original packaging is not supplied we will supply other secure packaging to keep the TV well protected in transit. Items are generally in excellent condition but can have some small marks on the outer casing/stand. Screens will be pristine unless otherwise mentioned. If there are any defects or noticeable marks/scratches we will attach pictures of the item and the description will detail any cosmetic damage on the items.

    All TVs sold on this website carry a 12 month 'return to base' warranty provided by ourselves (unless otherwise stated). Our guarantee on all of our products demonstrates our confidence in each and every product we sell. Upon collection the TV is unwrapped and you are given a demonstration of the TV for your peace of mind. This really is an amazing way to save hundreds off "Brand New" prices without sacrificing any of the quality or performance!

    Television Type: OLED

    General: 4K Ultra HD

    Picture: Billion Rich Colours, Perfect Black, Perfect Colour, 3D TV Ready, 2D-3D

    Smart: Netflix 4K, Screen Mirroring, Facebook/Twitter, YouTube, Catch Up TV, Smart TV, Smart Phone Remote Support

    VIEW DETAILS

  • 55 LG 55EGV Curved 4K OLED 4K Ultra HD Freeview HD Smart 3D TV

    £

    WAS £

    OLED

    Graded: Yes

    "Graded" televisions are items that High Street retailers can't sell on for various reasons. This may be because the TVs are surplus stock, end of line/discontined models, 30 day customer returns, unwanted gifts, or items with damaged packaging.

    When the TVs come into us at Electronic World they are technically tested, processed, repackaged and offered for sale. Before sale, all televisions undergo a comprehensive quality control process by our engineers. In the majority of cases the item will be supplied with its original packaging and will be in excellent condition and are classed as "Grade A" - the items we sell are not used but can have minor signs of handling. If the original packaging is not supplied we will supply other secure packaging to keep the TV well protected in transit. Items are generally in excellent condition but can have some small marks on the outer casing/stand. Screens will be pristine unless otherwise mentioned. If there are any defects or noticeable marks/scratches we will attach pictures of the item and the description will detail any cosmetic damage on the items.

    All TVs sold on this website carry a 12 month 'return to base' warranty provided by ourselves (unless otherwise stated). Our guarantee on all of our products demonstrates our confidence in each and every product we sell. Upon collection the TV is unwrapped and you are given a demonstration of the TV for your peace of mind. This really is an amazing way to save hundreds off "Brand New" prices without sacrificing any of the quality or performance!

    Television Type: OLED

    General: 4K Ultra HD

    Full HD p: Yes

    p refers to the number of horizontal lines whioch can be displayed by the TV screen. In order to view high definition images from your Blu-ray player or Playstation 3 at their very best you will require a TV capable of diplaying p images

    Picture: 3D TV Ready, 2D-3D

    VIEW DETAILS

Want to bring the cinema experience to your home? Then our cheap 3D TVs are the perfect choice. Here at Electronic World we can provide a wide range of state-of-the-art 3D TVs for sale at fantastic prices. Our cheap 3D TVs add a whole new dimension to your favourite films, TV, and games, providing a more immersive viewing experience that standard 2D TVs simply cannot match.

Cheap 3D TVs from Electronic World


At Electronic World our collection of 3D TVs includes the very latest TV technologies too, including an assortment of top-of-the-range 4K 3D TVs, so you can enjoy your favourite shows and 3D content in stunning 4K HD and experience picture-perfect pixels. We can also offer a selection of cutting edge full HD Curved 3D TVs. These TVs provide an enhanced viewing experience, allowing you to surround your senses in full HD glory.

At Electronic World we stock a fantastic range of cheap 3D TVs from some of the world's most respected television manufacturers, including Samsung, Sony and many more besides. What's more, not only do we stock some of the best TV models around, you will be pleasantly surprised at just how affordable our range of cheap 3D TVs are.

If you're wondering how we are able to offer such fantastic prices and discounts on our ranges of cheap TVs, it's simply due to the fact that the cheap TV deals we offer are all graded stock. Graded stock is that which high street retailers cannot sell for whatever reason. That could be because it's a customer return, has a damaged box, or is simply an end-of-line model. These items arrive at Electronic World and all are fully tried and tested by our engineers before being listed for sale.

Cutting Edge, Full HD Curved 3D TVs - Contact Us Today


Each and every one of the TVs for sale in our range of cheap 3D TVs comes with our very own 'return to base' warranty, ensuring that if anything happens within the first year, you have the confidence that you can simply return it to us; just as you'd be able to do if you had purchased it from a high street retailer. So when it comes to cheap 3D TVs, think Electronic World!

If you would like to know more about our range of 4K 3D TVs, or any of the other models in our range of 3D TVs, simply contact our friendly team, today!

Sours: https://www.electronicworldtv.co.uk/cheap-3d-tvs

Tv 4k cheap 3d

3D TV

Immerse yourself in delight while LG LED 3D TV brings your images to life. See the sparkle in your kid’s eyes as their favorite cartoon characters jump out the screen or be mesmerized at the breath-taking image of the aurora borealis. This television set has a 2D to 3D conversion system which enhances your viewing experience and immerses you further into whatever you’re watching. It does this by converting 2 dimensional programs, like sports or cartoons, into a full blown 3 dimensional videos.

Whether you sit at the center of the television or at its side, you never have to miss out on the magical experience brought on by 3D technology. With its wide-viewing angle design, this product was engineered to accommodate the whole family.

Are you worried about the electric cost this feature-packed television might bring you? Don’t be! This item’s efficiency has been recognized and rated by Energy Star. Energy Star is an international standard that is placed on appliances that uses 20 to 30 percent less energy than those items that are in the same category.
Show More.

Sours: https://factoryplus.com.au/tv-home-entertainment/television/3d-tv.html
5 Best Projector 3D 4K Ultra HD Smart Laser TV

4K TVs should have saved 3D – here's what went wrong

Whatever happened to 3D TVs? One moment they were being touted as the future of television, and for a few years, every major TV manufacturer was offering 3D as standard on their high-end panels. Then they disappeared completely – just as 4K TVs were being rolled out worldwide

But why did 4K supplant 3D in what should have been the latter’s heyday? Was this mere coincidence? Was it a matter of cost? Was it a lack of consumer interest in 3D? Or is 4K just easier to create and more convenient to watch?

The first mainstream 3D TVs were unveiled at CES , with most manufacturers displaying 3D TV demos of various types at the international expo. Later that year the first 3D TVs started hitting shelves. 

As with most new technology these cutting-edge panels were expensive, with inch panels starting at roughly $2, / £1, / AU$2, Prices soon fell, and by a Samsung inch p Full HD 3D TV could be picked up for around half the amount.

As expected, this increased sales, and by 3D TVs made up % of global TV sales, which equates to approximately 25 million units shipped. Most manufacturers and pundits predicted this trend would continue, with some predicting that as many as million 3D TVs would be sold in (via HDTVTest).

Suffice to say, these predictions were wrong. Neither market share nor units sold expanded greatly beyond ’s levels, and sales dropped sharply from onwards. This led Samsung to drop support for 3D TVs in , with all other major manufacturers doing likewise in Read on to find out why.

The rise of 3D

So, how does 3D work anyway? Essentially, 3D is an optical illusion that aims to trick the brain into perceiving a flat two-dimensional (2D) image as a three-dimensional (3D) image with depth. It achieves this via stereoscopy – feeding the left and right eyes slightly offset versions of the same image. Our brains then process these two video feeds and calculates the differences between them, which we perceive as stereoscopic vision with depth perception.

The 3D boom was enabled by the convergence of several technologies. In the cinemas this technology was digital cinemaphotography. This made capturing, reproducing, and displaying 3D content far easier than with film. The 3D debut of this technology was James Cameron’s movie Avatar. The film’s financial success and superb use of 3D paved the way for the 3D films that would follow, and it no doubt convinced the major TV manufactures, content creators and broadcasters that 3D TV would be equally popular in the home.

Another enabling technology was the sunglasses-style polarised 3D glasses. Unlike the older anaglyph (red and green) glasses, polarised glasses did not distort the film’s color space. Audiences could now enjoy 3D movies without compromising image quality.

Avatar worked well because it was shot natively in 3D from the start. Unfortunately, most 3D movies that came after were shot in 2D then converted to 3D in post-production, which bore inconsistent results. Perhaps this, and the increased cost of 3D tickets, accounted for falling returns from 3D movies, which resulted in studios making fewer 3D films over time. But if 3D cinema was being phased out gradually, why was support for 3D TV ended so abruptly, and seemingly all at once?

What happened to 3D TVs?

At their core, 3D TVs are the same as 2D TVs, they simply have the extra CPU power to display two full HD p images at once when in 3D mode. When in 2D mode they operate the same as any other comparable panel. The best TVs from onwards had the processor power to do this anyway, since they needed it to run their smart TV features and image-altering effects such as motion smoothing.

Soon 3D was everywhere. Almost all major blockbuster movies had a 3D variant in the cinemas, and almost all high-end TVs came with 3D as standard. There were two main competing technologies in the 3D TV market: active and passive, each with their own pros and cons.

Active 3D was favoured by Samsung and Sony. Here, the TV pulsed between the left and right images about times per second. Battery-powered ‘Active Shutter’ glasses were used to ensure each eye received only one set of images. The ‘lenses’ were miniature LCD screens that would alternately turn opaque times per second in sync with the TV via Bluetooth. Because the active lenses flickered so rapidly, the illusory depth perception was maintained. 

The major advantage Active Shutter 3D TVs had over passive ‘cinema’ 3D TVs was that each eye received a Full HD p image, so the resolutions of their 3D and 2D modes were the same.

They had several drawbacks, however. For a start, they were often locked to specific manufactures – for example, a pair of Samsung Active Shutter glasses wouldn’t work with a Sony Active 3D TV, and vice versa. Secondly, Active Shutter glasses were expensive at around $ / £ / AU$ per pair and were battery-powered, which made them somewhat heavy and uncomfortable to wear. Worse yet, the battery life on early models was limited to a few hours, barely long enough to watch a 3D movie in one sitting. (Later models were somewhat improved, though, sporting a longer battery life and reduced weight and cost.)

Sadly, all active shutter glasses suffered from both a flicker effect and ‘crosstalk’ – - both of which were distracting. Crosstalk became more pronounced the stronger the 3D effect grew. The only remedy was to reduce the strength of the 3D effect or turn it off completely.

Passive 3D used simple polarised glasses much like the cinemas. This was LG’s preferred option, which they marketed as ‘Cinema 3D’. They were lighter, more comfortable to wear, did not cause flicker, allegedly created less crosstalk, worked with all passive 3D TVs, didn’t require syncing or a built-in power source, and were far less expensive, costing as little as a cup of coffee for a pair. 

Passive glasses were the better option in every way but one – they cut the vertical resolution in half. On a Full HD p TV this resulted in lines, which was roughly the same as Standard Definition (SD) TV. This also created a very noticeable ‘screen door effect’ which degraded image quality, and this became increasingly distracting as screen sizes increased.

Sadly, there was no ideal 3D solution, and even at its best 3D TV suffered from some inherent problems. Two common complaints were eye-strain and eye fatigue, which made prolonged viewing uncomfortable for some. Stronger 3D effects and rapid on-screen changes tended to make these worse.

The need for stereoscopic vision for 3D to work means that some people are unable to perceive the effects of 3D TV. This includes those who possess only one functional eye, those with a lazy eye etc. Due to the eye strain it can cause, 3D content is not recommended for those under six, and even pre-teens are advised to watch it only in moderation. This of course reduces 3D TV’s potential audience.

Another issue with 3D TVs was that they were, well, a hassle’. To watch 3D content, you would need to find and put on your 3D glasses. If they were Active Shutter glasses you would need to turn them on and sync them via Bluetooth as well, all the while hoping you had remembered to charge them. You would lose the ability to do other things while watching TV, too, like using a smartphone, or pottering around the room, as you’d need to take off the 3D glasses to interact with your surroundings effectively.

For some, the hassle of this relegated 3D to being a movie night treat (along with the surround sound and popcorn,) and not something that was used regularly.

3D TV always had great potential, though – and if it had been introduced a little later in the history of TV development, closer to the arrival of 4K than HD, things might have turned out different.

Where do 4K TVs come into this?

A 4K TV is simply a TV with a resolution of x pixels (also known as Ultra HD). It packs in twice as many horizontal and vertical lines as p ‘Full-HD’ x screens, resulting in four times the pixel density for the same screen size and a clearer, sharper, brighter image.

4K was enabled by several technologies, including high-speed HDMI , 4K Blu-ray discs, and rising internet speeds allowing for higher-resolution streaming . These were essential due to the file sizes of native 4K content being so much greater than those of Full HD.

The advantages 4K has over regular HD is that the images can be brighter and sharper, especially if combined with other technologies such as OLED and HDR. This is most noticeable on larger screens. A inch p screen may look razer sharp at normal viewing distances, but a inch screen may look slightly fuzzy due to the pixels becoming spaced further apart, whereas a 65 inch 4K TV will retain its razor-like clarity.

There have been some downsides to 4K, however. Initially, there was a dearth of native 4K content, which meant viewers had to rely on upscaled p content. Some TVs handled this upscaling well, while on others it was shoddy and arguably looked worse than p. Another teething issue was the lack of sufficiently high-speed internet, which meant streamed 4K content was unreliable and prone to buffering – while offline 4K Blu-ray players could be costly solutions Indeed, when 4K was first unveiled some pundits predicted these problems would hinder 4K, and that the only use for so many pixels would be to perfect 3D TV.

But passive 3D at 4K resolution could have been the ideal home 3D TV solution. With vertical lines to work with, even when halved to lines the 3D image would still look fantastically sharp, whilst retaining the advantages of passive 3D TV. LG created a few such sets, such as the LG OLED65E6V. 

Unfortunately, few people got to experience this, as most manufacturers ended support for 3D TV when phasing in support for 4K. So why was 3D suddenly dropped like a hot potato?

It all comes down to how swiftly the issues around 4K were resolved. Live broadcasts such as BT Sports Ultra HD and streaming services such as Netflix Ultra HD began offering 4K content, while Internet service providers (ISPs) rolled out Superfast fibre broadband to cope with 4K’s demands.

The paucity of physical 4K content was solved by Blu-ray two packs which included both standard and 4K Blu-rays. 4K Blu-ray players found their way into many people’s homes by default, as video game consoles, such as the last-gen Xbox One S and the current-gen PS5 and Xbox Series X, all feature integral 4K Blu-ray players as standard. With such easy access to 4K content, and most high-end TVs featuring 4K screens to watch it on, it was only a matter of time until 4K TVs became the new standard.

But why did 4K supplant 3D TVs instead of supplementing them?

Filming native 3D content requires complex and expensive camera setups, and 2D to 3D post-production conversion is time-consuming and inconsistent. Filming native 4K is now pretty much standard, and 4K content can usually be downscaled to p quickly and easily. This makes 4K a more attractive proposition for content creators.

4K is also just far more convenient than 3D for many viewers. 4K viewing requires no more effort than viewing Full HD – you simply turn on, sit down, and watch. It does not involve additional accessories and face-wear, for one.

Now, in 4K’s heyday, I can’t help but think that combining 4K with passive 3D could have contributed to the ultimate home viewing experience. But who knows, perhaps 3D TV will make a comeback in the future, by being incorporated into some other technology? The arrival of 8K TVs has shown that consumer appetite for ever higher resolutions has not waned, and if 4K could have perfected passive 3D TV, just imagine what 8K could do for it.

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/news/4k-tvs-should-have-saved-3d-heres-what-went-wrong

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